2 Corrected spelling and grammar as much as I could. It wasn't bad at all, but I noticed some small incorrections
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You can't.

To securely sentsend information over an unsecure channel, you need encryption.

Symmetric encryption is out, because you would first need to transport the key, which you can't do securely over an unsecure channel[*].

That leaves you with public key cryptography. You could of course roll your own, but you don't want to be a Dave, so that's out. Which, which leaves you with HTTPS.

[*] You can of course try to use a secure channel to exchange the key, for example physical exchange of a key. Then you can use secret key crypto, eglike Kerberos.

You can't.

To securely sent information over an unsecure channel, you need encryption.

Symmetric encryption is out, because you would first need to transport the key, which you can't do securely over an unsecure channel[*].

That leaves you with public key cryptography. You could of course roll your own, but you don't want to be a Dave, so that's out. Which leaves you with HTTPS.

[*] You can of course try to use a secure channel to exchange the key, for example physical exchange of a key. Then you can use secret key crypto, eg Kerberos.

You can't.

To securely send information over an unsecure channel, you need encryption.

Symmetric encryption is out, because you would first need to transport the key, which you can't do securely over an unsecure channel[*].

That leaves you with public key cryptography. You could of course roll your own, but you don't want to be a Dave, so that's out, which leaves you with HTTPS.

[*] You can of course try to use a secure channel to exchange the key, for example physical exchange of a key. Then you can use secret key crypto, like Kerberos.

1
source | link

You can't.

To securely sent information over an unsecure channel, you need encryption.

Symmetric encryption is out, because you would first need to transport the key, which you can't do securely over an unsecure channel[*].

That leaves you with public key cryptography. You could of course roll your own, but you don't want to be a Dave, so that's out. Which leaves you with HTTPS.

[*] You can of course try to use a secure channel to exchange the key, for example physical exchange of a key. Then you can use secret key crypto, eg Kerberos.