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If I should never tell an admin my password (as it has been answered to the cited question) there is no reason that an admin knows my password even at the very beginning of my work in that company

One of the main reasons to this rule is that Admins should not access your confidential data such as mails, etc... Since there is no data associated with the account at the very beginning this is not an issue.

they generate a password for the user (NOT a change-at-first-login one)

Using a single sign-on password will ask for a normal password before one can change the configuration. So a password is needed before accessing the config.

I suspect anyway that most legacy systems allow admins to reset passwords with great freedom. Is it an accepted practice?

This is an accepted practice. Not old systems but newer systems like Office 365 also allows the admins to reset the users password without notifying the user. However any such resets gets logged in the system and the admin will be held responsible for any issues.

Also note that not all configurations can be changed at Admin level. Some things can only be performed by the user. Instead of telling each and every user to perform a set of steps, they are doing it ahead of time.


Some other concerns of sharing a password do not apply here such as

  1. Reusing the password is irrelevant as the password is not yours.
  2. None of your personal information is associated with the password.

To answer some comments,

I suspect that "there is no data associated with the account at the very beginning" it's not absolutely true: I could have some emails in my mailbox (someone could have sent my some confidential info to my email address, because the mailbox has been activated before I first log in)

by Diego Pascotto

Mail Id should not be shared to anyone by the Admins before configuration. The mailbox must have been activated when setting up outlook. Email Ids are shared only after single sign-in password is set. Also as pointed out by James Snell, receiving an email within minutes of account creation is unlikely.

A competent company has images, procedures, via automation that take care of these things without ever logging in as the new user at any time.

by Sokel

Small companies do not always invest in automating. If a company hires around 10 staff per year and each with a different role the effort required to bring automation and maintain it will be greater than the manual effort. Automation is only worth the effort when you are having job that is done repeatedly in large numbers. In other words, the effort required for automation should be less than what your effort required for manual work

If the admin has had unmonitored access to your account at any point in time; they could've set up anything under your name - preventing any returns to them.

by UKMonkey

Any actions taken by the admins during this time can be linked back to them as it is clear that the account is not handed over to the user until the user resets the password using the single sign-on password.

If I should never tell an admin my password (as it has been answered to the cited question) there is no reason that an admin knows my password even at the very beginning of my work in that company

One of the main reasons to this rule is that Admins should not access your confidential data such as mails, etc... Since there is no data associated with the account at the very beginning this is not an issue.

they generate a password for the user (NOT a change-at-first-login one)

Using a single sign-on password will ask for a normal password before one can change the configuration. So a password is needed before accessing the config.

I suspect anyway that most legacy systems allow admins to reset passwords with great freedom. Is it an accepted practice?

This is an accepted practice. Not old systems but newer systems like Office 365 also allows the admins to reset the users password without notifying the user. However any such resets gets logged in the system and the admin will be held responsible for any issues.

Also note that not all configurations can be changed at Admin level. Some things can only be performed by the user. Instead of telling each and every user to perform a set of steps, they are doing it ahead of time.


Some other concerns of sharing a password do not apply here such as

  1. Reusing the password is irrelevant as the password is not yours.
  2. None of your personal information is associated with the password.

To answer some comments,

I suspect that "there is no data associated with the account at the very beginning" it's not absolutely true: I could have some emails in my mailbox (someone could have sent my some confidential info to my email address, because the mailbox has been activated before I first log in)

by Diego Pascotto

Mail Id should not be shared to anyone by the Admins before configuration. The mailbox must have been activated when setting up outlook. Email Ids are shared only after single sign-in password is set. Also as pointed out by James Snell, receiving an email within minutes of account creation is unlikely.

A competent company has images, procedures, via automation that take care of these things without ever logging in as the new user at any time.

by Sokel

Small companies do not always invest in automating. If a company hires around 10 staff per year and each with a different role the effort required to bring automation and maintain it will be greater than the manual effort. Automation is only worth the effort when you are having job that is done repeatedly in large numbers.

If the admin has had unmonitored access to your account at any point in time; they could've set up anything under your name - preventing any returns to them.

by UKMonkey

Any actions taken by the admins during this time can be linked back to them as it is clear that the account is not handed over to the user until the user resets the password using the single sign-on password.

If I should never tell an admin my password (as it has been answered to the cited question) there is no reason that an admin knows my password even at the very beginning of my work in that company

One of the main reasons to this rule is that Admins should not access your confidential data such as mails, etc... Since there is no data associated with the account at the very beginning this is not an issue.

they generate a password for the user (NOT a change-at-first-login one)

Using a single sign-on password will ask for a normal password before one can change the configuration. So a password is needed before accessing the config.

I suspect anyway that most legacy systems allow admins to reset passwords with great freedom. Is it an accepted practice?

This is an accepted practice. Not old systems but newer systems like Office 365 also allows the admins to reset the users password without notifying the user. However any such resets gets logged in the system and the admin will be held responsible for any issues.

Also note that not all configurations can be changed at Admin level. Some things can only be performed by the user. Instead of telling each and every user to perform a set of steps, they are doing it ahead of time.


Some other concerns of sharing a password do not apply here such as

  1. Reusing the password is irrelevant as the password is not yours.
  2. None of your personal information is associated with the password.

To answer some comments,

I suspect that "there is no data associated with the account at the very beginning" it's not absolutely true: I could have some emails in my mailbox (someone could have sent my some confidential info to my email address, because the mailbox has been activated before I first log in)

by Diego Pascotto

Mail Id should not be shared to anyone by the Admins before configuration. The mailbox must have been activated when setting up outlook. Email Ids are shared only after single sign-in password is set. Also as pointed out by James Snell, receiving an email within minutes of account creation is unlikely.

A competent company has images, procedures, via automation that take care of these things without ever logging in as the new user at any time.

by Sokel

Small companies do not always invest in automating. If a company hires around 10 staff per year and each with a different role the effort required to bring automation and maintain it will be greater than the manual effort. Automation is only worth the effort when you are having job that is done repeatedly in large numbers. In other words, the effort required for automation should be less than what your effort required for manual work

If the admin has had unmonitored access to your account at any point in time; they could've set up anything under your name - preventing any returns to them.

by UKMonkey

Any actions taken by the admins during this time can be linked back to them as it is clear that the account is not handed over to the user until the user resets the password using the single sign-on password.

7 added 2 characters in body
source | link

If I should never tell an admin my password (as it has been answered to the cited question) there is no reason that an admin knows my password even at the very beginning of my work in that company

One of the main reasons to this rule is that Admins should not access your confidential data such as mails, etc... Since there is no data associated with the account at the very beginning this is not an issue.

they generate a password for the user (NOT a change-at-first-login one)

Using a single sign-on password will ask for a normal password before one can change the configuration. So a password is needed before accessing the config.

I suspect anyway that most legacy systems allow admins to reset passwords with great freedom. Is it an accepted practice?

This is an accepted practice. Not old systems but newer systems like Office 365 also allows the admins to reset the users password without notifying the user. However any such resets gets logged in the system and the admin will be held responsible for any issues.

Also note that not all configurations can be changed at Admin level. Some things can only be performed by the user. Instead of telling each and every user to perform a set of steps, they are doing it ahead of time.


Some other concerns of sharing a password do not apply here such as

  1. Reusing the password is irrelevant as the password is not yours.
  2. None of your personal information is associated with the password.

To answer some comments,

I suspect that "there is no data associated with the account at the very beginning" it's not absolutely true: I could have some emails in my mailbox (someone could have sent my some confidential info to my email address, because the mailbox has been activated before I first log in)

by Diego Pascotto

Mail Id should not be shared to anyone by the Admins before configuration. The mailbox must have been activated when setting up outlook. Email Ids are shared only after single sign-in password is set. Also as pointed out by James Snell, receiving an email within minutes of account creation is unlikely.

A competent company has images, procedures, via automation that take care of these things without ever logging in as the new user at any time.

by Sokel

Small companies do not always invest in automating. If a company hires around 10 staff per year and each with a different role the effort required to bring automation and maintain it will be greater than the manual effort. Automation is only worth the effort when you are having job that is done repeatedly in large numbers.

If the admin has had unmonitored access to your account at any point in time; they could've set up anything under your name - preventing any returns to them.

by UKMonkey

Any actions taken by the admins during this time can be linked back to them as it is clear that the account is not handed over to the user until the user resets the password using the signsingle sign-on password.

If I should never tell an admin my password (as it has been answered to the cited question) there is no reason that an admin knows my password even at the very beginning of my work in that company

One of the main reasons to this rule is that Admins should not access your confidential data such as mails, etc... Since there is no data associated with the account at the very beginning this is not an issue.

they generate a password for the user (NOT a change-at-first-login one)

Using a single sign-on password will ask for a normal password before one can change the configuration. So a password is needed before accessing the config.

I suspect anyway that most legacy systems allow admins to reset passwords with great freedom. Is it an accepted practice?

This is an accepted practice. Not old systems but newer systems like Office 365 also allows the admins to reset the users password without notifying the user. However any such resets gets logged in the system and the admin will be held responsible for any issues.

Also note that not all configurations can be changed at Admin level. Some things can only be performed by the user. Instead of telling each and every user to perform a set of steps, they are doing it ahead of time.


Some other concerns of sharing a password do not apply here such as

  1. Reusing the password is irrelevant as the password is not yours.
  2. None of your personal information is associated with the password.

To answer some comments,

I suspect that "there is no data associated with the account at the very beginning" it's not absolutely true: I could have some emails in my mailbox (someone could have sent my some confidential info to my email address, because the mailbox has been activated before I first log in)

by Diego Pascotto

Mail Id should not be shared to anyone by the Admins before configuration. The mailbox must have been activated when setting up outlook. Email Ids are shared only after single sign-in password is set. Also as pointed out by James Snell, receiving an email within minutes of account creation is unlikely.

A competent company has images, procedures, via automation that take care of these things without ever logging in as the new user at any time.

by Sokel

Small companies do not always invest in automating. If a company hires around 10 staff per year and each with a different role the effort required to bring automation and maintain it will be greater than the manual effort. Automation is only worth the effort when you are having job that is done repeatedly in large numbers.

If the admin has had unmonitored access to your account at any point in time; they could've set up anything under your name - preventing any returns to them.

by UKMonkey

Any actions taken by the admins during this time can be linked back to them as it is clear that the account is not handed over to the user until the user resets the password using the sign sign-on password.

If I should never tell an admin my password (as it has been answered to the cited question) there is no reason that an admin knows my password even at the very beginning of my work in that company

One of the main reasons to this rule is that Admins should not access your confidential data such as mails, etc... Since there is no data associated with the account at the very beginning this is not an issue.

they generate a password for the user (NOT a change-at-first-login one)

Using a single sign-on password will ask for a normal password before one can change the configuration. So a password is needed before accessing the config.

I suspect anyway that most legacy systems allow admins to reset passwords with great freedom. Is it an accepted practice?

This is an accepted practice. Not old systems but newer systems like Office 365 also allows the admins to reset the users password without notifying the user. However any such resets gets logged in the system and the admin will be held responsible for any issues.

Also note that not all configurations can be changed at Admin level. Some things can only be performed by the user. Instead of telling each and every user to perform a set of steps, they are doing it ahead of time.


Some other concerns of sharing a password do not apply here such as

  1. Reusing the password is irrelevant as the password is not yours.
  2. None of your personal information is associated with the password.

To answer some comments,

I suspect that "there is no data associated with the account at the very beginning" it's not absolutely true: I could have some emails in my mailbox (someone could have sent my some confidential info to my email address, because the mailbox has been activated before I first log in)

by Diego Pascotto

Mail Id should not be shared to anyone by the Admins before configuration. The mailbox must have been activated when setting up outlook. Email Ids are shared only after single sign-in password is set. Also as pointed out by James Snell, receiving an email within minutes of account creation is unlikely.

A competent company has images, procedures, via automation that take care of these things without ever logging in as the new user at any time.

by Sokel

Small companies do not always invest in automating. If a company hires around 10 staff per year and each with a different role the effort required to bring automation and maintain it will be greater than the manual effort. Automation is only worth the effort when you are having job that is done repeatedly in large numbers.

If the admin has had unmonitored access to your account at any point in time; they could've set up anything under your name - preventing any returns to them.

by UKMonkey

Any actions taken by the admins during this time can be linked back to them as it is clear that the account is not handed over to the user until the user resets the password using the single sign-on password.

6 Clarify meaning in the fourth paragraph
source | link

If I should never tell an admin my password (as it has been answered to the cited question) there is no reason that an admin knows my password even at the very beginning of my work in that company

One of the main reasons to this rule is that Admins should not access your confidential data such as mails, etc... Since there is no data associated with the account at the very beginning this is not an issue.

they generate a password for the user (NOT a change-at-first-login one)

Using a single sign-on password will ask for a normal password before one can change the configuration. So a password is needed before accessing the config.

I suspect anyway that most legacy systems allow admins to reset passwords with great freedom. Is it an accepted practice?

This is an accepted practice. Not old systems but newer systems like Office 365 also allows the admins to reset the users password without notifying the user. However any such resets gets logged in the system and the admin will be held responsible for any issues.

Also note that not all configurations cannotcan be changed at Admin level. Some things can only be performed by the user. Instead of telling each and every user to perform a set of steps, they are doing it ahead of time.


Some other concerns of sharing a password do not apply here such as

  1. Reusing the password is irrelevant as the password is not yours.
  2. None of your personal information is associated with the password.

To answer some comments,

I suspect that "there is no data associated with the account at the very beginning" it's not absolutely true: I could have some emails in my mailbox (someone could have sent my some confidential info to my email address, because the mailbox has been activated before I first log in)

by Diego Pascotto

Mail Id should not be shared to anyone by the Admins before configuration. The mailbox must have been activated when setting up outlook. Email Ids are shared only after single sign-in password is set. Also as pointed out by James Snell, receiving an email within minutes of account creation is unlikely.

A competent company has images, procedures, via automation that take care of these things without ever logging in as the new user at any time.

by Sokel

Small companies do not always invest in automating. If a company hires around 10 staff per year and each with a different role the effort required to bring automation and maintain it will be greater than the manual effort. Automation is only worth the effort when you are having job that is done repeatedly in large numbers.

If the admin has had unmonitored access to your account at any point in time; they could've set up anything under your name - preventing any returns to them.

by UKMonkey

Any actions taken by the admins during this time can be linked back to them as it is clear that the account is not handed over to the user until the user resets the password using the sign sign-on password.

If I should never tell an admin my password (as it has been answered to the cited question) there is no reason that an admin knows my password even at the very beginning of my work in that company

One of the main reasons to this rule is that Admins should not access your confidential data such as mails, etc... Since there is no data associated with the account at the very beginning this is not an issue.

they generate a password for the user (NOT a change-at-first-login one)

Using a single sign-on password will ask for a normal password before one can change the configuration. So a password is needed before accessing the config.

I suspect anyway that most legacy systems allow admins to reset passwords with great freedom. Is it an accepted practice?

This is an accepted practice. Not old systems but newer systems like Office 365 also allows the admins to reset the users password without notifying the user. However any such resets gets logged in the system and the admin will be held responsible for any issues.

Also note that all configurations cannot be changed at Admin level. Some things can only be performed by the user. Instead of telling each and every user to perform a set of steps they are doing it.


Some other concerns of sharing a password do not apply here such as

  1. Reusing the password is irrelevant as the password is not yours.
  2. None of your personal information is associated with the password.

To answer some comments,

I suspect that "there is no data associated with the account at the very beginning" it's not absolutely true: I could have some emails in my mailbox (someone could have sent my some confidential info to my email address, because the mailbox has been activated before I first log in)

by Diego Pascotto

Mail Id should not be shared to anyone by the Admins before configuration. The mailbox must have been activated when setting up outlook. Email Ids are shared only after single sign-in password is set. Also as pointed out by James Snell, receiving an email within minutes of account creation is unlikely.

A competent company has images, procedures, via automation that take care of these things without ever logging in as the new user at any time.

by Sokel

Small companies do not always invest in automating. If a company hires around 10 staff per year and each with a different role the effort required to bring automation and maintain it will be greater than the manual effort. Automation is only worth the effort when you are having job that is done repeatedly in large numbers.

If the admin has had unmonitored access to your account at any point in time; they could've set up anything under your name - preventing any returns to them.

by UKMonkey

Any actions taken by the admins during this time can be linked back to them as it is clear that the account is not handed over to the user until the user resets the password using the sign sign-on password.

If I should never tell an admin my password (as it has been answered to the cited question) there is no reason that an admin knows my password even at the very beginning of my work in that company

One of the main reasons to this rule is that Admins should not access your confidential data such as mails, etc... Since there is no data associated with the account at the very beginning this is not an issue.

they generate a password for the user (NOT a change-at-first-login one)

Using a single sign-on password will ask for a normal password before one can change the configuration. So a password is needed before accessing the config.

I suspect anyway that most legacy systems allow admins to reset passwords with great freedom. Is it an accepted practice?

This is an accepted practice. Not old systems but newer systems like Office 365 also allows the admins to reset the users password without notifying the user. However any such resets gets logged in the system and the admin will be held responsible for any issues.

Also note that not all configurations can be changed at Admin level. Some things can only be performed by the user. Instead of telling each and every user to perform a set of steps, they are doing it ahead of time.


Some other concerns of sharing a password do not apply here such as

  1. Reusing the password is irrelevant as the password is not yours.
  2. None of your personal information is associated with the password.

To answer some comments,

I suspect that "there is no data associated with the account at the very beginning" it's not absolutely true: I could have some emails in my mailbox (someone could have sent my some confidential info to my email address, because the mailbox has been activated before I first log in)

by Diego Pascotto

Mail Id should not be shared to anyone by the Admins before configuration. The mailbox must have been activated when setting up outlook. Email Ids are shared only after single sign-in password is set. Also as pointed out by James Snell, receiving an email within minutes of account creation is unlikely.

A competent company has images, procedures, via automation that take care of these things without ever logging in as the new user at any time.

by Sokel

Small companies do not always invest in automating. If a company hires around 10 staff per year and each with a different role the effort required to bring automation and maintain it will be greater than the manual effort. Automation is only worth the effort when you are having job that is done repeatedly in large numbers.

If the admin has had unmonitored access to your account at any point in time; they could've set up anything under your name - preventing any returns to them.

by UKMonkey

Any actions taken by the admins during this time can be linked back to them as it is clear that the account is not handed over to the user until the user resets the password using the sign sign-on password.

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