4 deleted 20 characters in body
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Yes, the scenario described is completely possible. ItAs an example, it happened to Google relatively recently whenin 2015 when they lost control of google.com, and Microsoft back in 2003 with hotmail.co.uk. Yes, thoseThose domains got bought. For Google's case:

...He also received emails with internal information, which he has since reported to Google's security team, Ved said.

...His run of Google.com was short-lived though. Google Domains canceled the sale a minute later...

For Microsoft, who lost control of a domain for an email service (possibly, possibly putting thousands in the situation you describe)described:

[Microsoft] managed to contact hotmail.co.uk's new owner, grovel at their mistake and sort out the mess. By all accounts, hotmail.co.uk will be returned in a few days.


The only way to be sure that confidential emails don't end up in the wrong handsleak is to own the domain indefinitely. However, as mentioned by usr-local-ΕΨΗΕΛΩΝ, you could balance your possible loss if a confidential email leaks versus the cost of owning the domain for a long time.

Practically, what you could do is replace your email (that usesemails with the expiring domain) on sites that you registered foron. Also, inform your contacts to eschew your old email (or domain, or both).

As an additional step, hold on to the domain for a year or tenfive and deliberately blackhole your MX records, so that senders who didn't get (or could not get) the memo would be greeted by errors. For Gmail, a sample would be

Gmail - Message not delivered

Yes, the scenario described is completely possible. It happened to Google relatively recently when they lost control of google.com and Microsoft back in 2003 with hotmail.co.uk. Yes, those domains got bought. For Google's case:

...He also received emails with internal information, which he has since reported to Google's security team, Ved said.

...His run of Google.com was short-lived though. Google Domains canceled the sale a minute later...

For Microsoft, who lost control of a domain for an email service (possibly putting thousands in the situation you describe):

[Microsoft] managed to contact hotmail.co.uk's new owner, grovel at their mistake and sort out the mess. By all accounts, hotmail.co.uk will be returned in a few days.


The only way to be sure that confidential emails don't end up in the wrong hands is to own the domain indefinitely. However, as mentioned by usr-local-ΕΨΗΕΛΩΝ, you could balance your possible loss if a confidential email leaks versus the cost of owning the domain for a long time.

Practically, what you could do is replace your email (that uses the expiring domain) on sites that you registered for. Also inform your contacts to eschew your old email.

As an additional step, hold on to the domain for a year or ten and deliberately blackhole your MX records, so that senders who didn't get (or could not get) the memo would be greeted by errors. For Gmail, a sample would be

Gmail - Message not delivered

Yes, the scenario described is possible. As an example, it happened to Google in 2015 when they lost control of google.com, and Microsoft back in 2003 with hotmail.co.uk. Those domains got bought. For Google's case:

...He also received emails with internal information, which he has since reported to Google's security team, Ved said.

...His run of Google.com was short-lived though. Google Domains canceled the sale a minute later...

For Microsoft, who lost control of a domain for an email service, possibly putting thousands in the situation described:

[Microsoft] managed to contact hotmail.co.uk's new owner, grovel at their mistake and sort out the mess. By all accounts, hotmail.co.uk will be returned in a few days.


The only way to be sure that confidential emails don't leak is to own the domain indefinitely. However, as mentioned by usr-local-ΕΨΗΕΛΩΝ, you could balance your possible loss if a confidential email leaks versus the cost of owning the domain for a long time.

Practically, what you could do is replace your emails with the expiring domain on sites that you registered on. Also, inform your contacts to eschew your old email (or domain, or both).

As an additional step, hold on to the domain for a year or five and deliberately blackhole your MX records, so that senders who didn't get (or could not get) the memo would be greeted by errors. For Gmail, a sample would be

Gmail - Message not delivered

3 restructured answer
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Yes, the scenario described is completely possible. It happened to Google relatively recently when they lost control of google.com and Microsoft back in 2003 with hotmail.co.uk. Yes, those domains got bought. For Google's case:

...He also received emails with internal information, which he has since since reported to Google's security team, Ved said.

...His run of Google.com was short-lived though. Google Domains canceled the sale a minute later...

For Microsoft, who lost control of a domain for an email service (possibly putting thousands in the situation you describe):

[Microsoft] managed to contact hotmail.co.uk's new owner, grovel at their mistake and sort out the mess. By all accounts, hotmail.co.uk will be returned in a few days.

 

The only way to be sure that confidential emails don't end up in the wrong hands is to own the domain indefinitely. However, as mentioned by usr-local-ΕΨΗΕΛΩΝ, you could balance your possible loss if a confidential email leaks versus the cost of owning the domain for a long time.


 

Practically, what you could do is replace your email (that uses the expiring domain) on sites that you registered for. Also inform your contacts to eschew your old email.

As an additional step, hold on to the domain for a year or ten and deliberately blackhole your MX records, so that senders who didn't get (or could not get) the memo would be greeted by errors. For Gmail, a sample would be

Gmail - Message not delivered

Yes, the scenario described is completely possible. It happened to Google relatively recently when they lost control of google.com and Microsoft back in 2003 with hotmail.co.uk. Yes, those domains got bought. For Google's case:

...He also received emails with internal information, which he has since reported to Google's security team, Ved said.

The only way to be sure that confidential emails don't end up in the wrong hands is to own the domain indefinitely. However, as mentioned by usr-local-ΕΨΗΕΛΩΝ, you could balance your possible loss if a confidential email leaks versus the cost of owning the domain for a long time.


 

Practically, what you could do is replace your email (that uses the expiring domain) on sites that you registered for. Also inform your contacts to eschew your old email.

As an additional step, hold on to the domain for a year or ten and deliberately blackhole your MX records, so that senders who didn't get (or could not get) the memo would be greeted by errors. For Gmail, a sample would be

Gmail - Message not delivered

Yes, the scenario described is completely possible. It happened to Google relatively recently when they lost control of google.com and Microsoft back in 2003 with hotmail.co.uk. Yes, those domains got bought. For Google's case:

...He also received emails with internal information, which he has since reported to Google's security team, Ved said.

...His run of Google.com was short-lived though. Google Domains canceled the sale a minute later...

For Microsoft, who lost control of a domain for an email service (possibly putting thousands in the situation you describe):

[Microsoft] managed to contact hotmail.co.uk's new owner, grovel at their mistake and sort out the mess. By all accounts, hotmail.co.uk will be returned in a few days.

 

The only way to be sure that confidential emails don't end up in the wrong hands is to own the domain indefinitely. However, as mentioned by usr-local-ΕΨΗΕΛΩΝ, you could balance your possible loss if a confidential email leaks versus the cost of owning the domain for a long time.

Practically, what you could do is replace your email (that uses the expiring domain) on sites that you registered for. Also inform your contacts to eschew your old email.

As an additional step, hold on to the domain for a year or ten and deliberately blackhole your MX records, so that senders who didn't get (or could not get) the memo would be greeted by errors. For Gmail, a sample would be

Gmail - Message not delivered

2 added interesting tidbits
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Yes, the scenario described is completely possible. It happened to Google relatively recently when they lost control of google.com and Microsoft back in 2003 with hotmail.co.uk. Yes, those domains got bought. For Google's case:

...He also received emails with internal information, which he has since reported to Google's security team, Ved said.

The only way to be sure that confidential emails don't end up in the wrong hands is to own the domain indefinitely. However, as mentioned by usr-local-ΕΨΗΕΛΩΝ, you could balance your possible loss if a confidential email leaks versus the cost of owning the domain for a long time.


Practically, what you could do is replace your email (that uses the expiring domain) on sites that you registered for. Also inform your contacts to eschew your old email.

As an additional step, hold on to the domain for a year or ten and deliberately blackhole your MX records, so that senders who didn't get (or could not get) the memo would be greeted by errors. For Gmail, a sample would be

Gmail - Message not delivered

Yes, the scenario described is completely possible. It happened to Google relatively recently and Microsoft back in 2003. For Google's case:

...He also received emails with internal information, which he has since reported to Google's security team, Ved said.

The only way to be sure that confidential emails don't end up in the wrong hands is to own the domain indefinitely. However, as mentioned by usr-local-ΕΨΗΕΛΩΝ, you could balance your possible loss if a confidential email leaks versus the cost of owning the domain for a long time.


Practically, what you could do is replace your email (that uses the expiring domain) on sites that you registered for. Also inform your contacts to eschew your old email.

As an additional step, hold on to the domain for a year or ten and deliberately blackhole your MX records, so that senders who didn't get (or could not get) the memo would be greeted by errors. For Gmail, a sample would be

Gmail - Message not delivered

Yes, the scenario described is completely possible. It happened to Google relatively recently when they lost control of google.com and Microsoft back in 2003 with hotmail.co.uk. Yes, those domains got bought. For Google's case:

...He also received emails with internal information, which he has since reported to Google's security team, Ved said.

The only way to be sure that confidential emails don't end up in the wrong hands is to own the domain indefinitely. However, as mentioned by usr-local-ΕΨΗΕΛΩΝ, you could balance your possible loss if a confidential email leaks versus the cost of owning the domain for a long time.


Practically, what you could do is replace your email (that uses the expiring domain) on sites that you registered for. Also inform your contacts to eschew your old email.

As an additional step, hold on to the domain for a year or ten and deliberately blackhole your MX records, so that senders who didn't get (or could not get) the memo would be greeted by errors. For Gmail, a sample would be

Gmail - Message not delivered

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