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It's called phishing, and no, 2FA doesn't prevent it in most cases (but you should still use 2FA). This sort of attack is why people recommend to always look at the browser's address bar before typing in a password (though that's had its own issues). When logging in through a local application though, you just have to trust that application to not steal your password. If you don't trust it, don't run it.

The only type of 2FA I'm aware of that preventscan prevent this sort of attack is Webauthn and U2F, but this is only applicable when logging in through a trusted web browser. With a local application, all bets are off.

It's called phishing, and no, 2FA doesn't prevent it (but you should still use 2FA). This sort of attack is why people recommend to always look at the browser's address bar before typing in a password (though that's had its own issues). When logging in through a local application though, you just have to trust that application to not steal your password. If you don't trust it, don't run it.

The only type of 2FA I'm aware of that prevents this sort of attack is Webauthn and U2F, but this is only applicable when logging in through a trusted web browser. With a local application, all bets are off.

It's called phishing, and no, 2FA doesn't prevent it in most cases (but you should still use 2FA). This sort of attack is why people recommend to always look at the browser's address bar before typing in a password (though that's had its own issues). When logging in through a local application though, you just have to trust that application to not steal your password. If you don't trust it, don't run it.

The only type of 2FA I'm aware of that can prevent this sort of attack is Webauthn and U2F, but this is only applicable when logging in through a trusted web browser. With a local application, all bets are off.

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It's called phishing, and no, 2FA doesn't prevent it (but you should still use 2FA). This sort of attack is why people recommend to always look at the browser's address bar before typing in a password (though that's had its own issues). When logging in through a local application though, you just have to trust that application to not steal your password. If you don't trust it, don't run it.

The only type of 2FA I'm aware of that prevents this sort of attack is Webauthn and U2F, but this is only applicable when logging in through a trusted web browser. With a local application, all bets are off.