Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
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In addition to the other answers here, the query string is also stored in the webserver's logfiles, HTTP Proxies, and can even be seen if SSL is used in conjunction with a SSL monitoring tools like Bluecoat.

No, sensitive data should not be sent via a HTTP "GET" and should always be sent via "POST"

Edit:

One more reason you should use a POST is because GETs are more susceptible to CSRF attacks

In addition to the other answers here, the query string is also stored in the webserver's logfiles, HTTP Proxies, and can even be seen if SSL is used in conjunction with a SSL monitoring tools like Bluecoat.

No, sensitive data should not be sent via a HTTP "GET" and should always be sent via "POST"

In addition to the other answers here, the query string is also stored in the webserver's logfiles, HTTP Proxies, and can even be seen if SSL is used in conjunction with a SSL monitoring tools like Bluecoat.

No, sensitive data should not be sent via a HTTP "GET" and should always be sent via "POST"

Edit:

One more reason you should use a POST is because GETs are more susceptible to CSRF attacks

1
source | link

In addition to the other answers here, the query string is also stored in the webserver's logfiles, HTTP Proxies, and can even be seen if SSL is used in conjunction with a SSL monitoring tools like Bluecoat.

No, sensitive data should not be sent via a HTTP "GET" and should always be sent via "POST"