2 Adding an answer to the actual question asked, along with the existing more correct answer.
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YouAs I understand it, an untrusted Java applet run in the browser is going to be sandboxed, so I don't believe it will have any more access to your system if you download it and run it in your browser locally than if you run it from the originating server, or from your browser cache, at least by design.

However, you should be concerned about Java applets, period. The number of vulnerabilities discovered in the JRE in the last few years is absolutely staggering. It's highly inadvisable to allow Java to run in the browser, andso I would suggest that you certainly don't want to run untrusted applets under any conditions.

You should be concerned about Java applets, period. The number of vulnerabilities discovered in the JRE in the last few years is absolutely staggering. It's highly inadvisable to allow Java to run in the browser, and you certainly don't want to run untrusted applets under any conditions.

As I understand it, an untrusted Java applet run in the browser is going to be sandboxed, so I don't believe it will have any more access to your system if you download it and run it in your browser locally than if you run it from the originating server, or from your browser cache, at least by design.

However, you should be concerned about Java applets, period. The number of vulnerabilities discovered in the JRE in the last few years is absolutely staggering. It's highly inadvisable to allow Java to run in the browser, so I would suggest that you don't want to run untrusted applets under any conditions.

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You should be concerned about Java applets, period. The number of vulnerabilities discovered in the JRE in the last few years is absolutely staggering. It's highly inadvisable to allow Java to run in the browser, and you certainly don't want to run untrusted applets under any conditions.