3 Copy edited (e.g. ref. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows_7> and <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twitter>). "malware" is an uncountable noun - <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/malware#Noun>.
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I've been trying to research malware techniques lately, as malware analysis intrigues me. I've got a pretty heavy background in .NET, and based on my more than seven years experience in .NET, I feel that I could write a pretty complex piece of malware rather quickly if I was so inclined. Everything that I've seen suggests that malware written in .NET is for the "simple" or "unsophisticated" pieces of malware, why is that?

Obviously, I understand the differences between .NET and C/C++ in regards to the low level stuff. I also understand that .NET is much more easily reversible than C/C++, but still, I would think the benefit outweighs the cost here. Isn't it much quicker to write malware using .NET than C/C++? Especially now that all Windows 7Windows 7 PCs ship with the .NET framework already installed.

Other than the "low level stuff", is there a reason that malware authors avoid .NET and use C/C++ instead that I'm not aware of? Why does it appear that in the underground "hacker" forums, everybody despises .NET?

For example, if I wanted to make a program that regularly checked a Twitter account for new commands to execute, I could easily do this in about an hour in .NET and just a few lines of code. In C/C++, this would be a lot more work, no?

I've been trying to research malware techniques lately, as malware analysis intrigues me. I've got a pretty heavy background in .NET, and based on my more than seven years experience in .NET, I feel that I could write a pretty complex piece of malware rather quickly if I was so inclined. Everything that I've seen suggests that malware written in .NET is for the "simple" or "unsophisticated" pieces of malware, why is that?

Obviously, I understand the differences between .NET and C/C++ in regards to the low level stuff. I also understand that .NET is much more easily reversible than C/C++, but still, I would think the benefit outweighs the cost here. Isn't it much quicker to write malware using .NET than C/C++? Especially now that all Windows 7 PCs ship with the .NET framework already installed.

Other than the "low level stuff", is there a reason that malware authors avoid .NET and use C/C++ instead that I'm not aware of? Why does it appear that in the underground "hacker" forums, everybody despises .NET?

For example, if I wanted to make a program that regularly checked a Twitter account for new commands to execute, I could easily do this in about an hour in .NET and just a few lines of code. In C/C++, this would be a lot more work, no?

I've been trying to research malware techniques lately, as malware analysis intrigues me. I've got a pretty heavy background in .NET, and based on my more than seven years experience in .NET, I feel that I could write a pretty complex piece of malware rather quickly if I was so inclined. Everything that I've seen suggests that malware written in .NET is for the "simple" or "unsophisticated" pieces of malware, why is that?

Obviously, I understand the differences between .NET and C/C++ in regards to the low level stuff. I also understand that .NET is much more easily reversible than C/C++, but still, I would think the benefit outweighs the cost here. Isn't it much quicker to write malware using .NET than C/C++? Especially now that all Windows 7 PCs ship with the .NET framework already installed.

Other than the "low level stuff", is there a reason that malware authors avoid .NET and use C/C++ instead that I'm not aware of? Why does it appear that in the underground "hacker" forums, everybody despises .NET?

For example, if I wanted to make a program that regularly checked a Twitter account for new commands to execute, I could easily do this in about an hour in .NET and just a few lines of code. In C/C++, this would be a lot more work, no?

2 Copy edited (e.g. ref. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows_7> and <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twitter>). "malware" is an uncountable noun - <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/malware#Noun>.
source | link

Why aren'tisn't sophisticated Malwaremalware written with .NET?

I've been trying to research malware techniques lately, as malware analysis intrigues me. I'veI've got a pretty heavy background in .NET, and based on my 7+more than seven years experience in .NET, I feel that I could write a pretty complex piece of malware rather quickly if I was so inclined. EverythingEverything that I've seen suggests that malware written in .NET is for the "simple" or "unsophisticated" pieces of malware, why is that?

Obviously, I understand the differences between .NET and C/C++ in regards to the low level stuff. II also understand that .NET is much more easily reversible than C/C++, but still, I would think the benefit outweighs the cost here. Isn'tIsn't it much quicker to write malware using .NET than C/C++? Especially now that all Win7Windows 7 PCs ship with the .NET framework already installed.

Other than the "low level stuff", is there a reason that malware authors avoid .NET and use C/C++ instead that I'm not aware of? WhyWhy does it appear that in the underground "hacker" forums, everybody despises .NET?

For example, if I wanted to make a program that regularly checked a twitterTwitter account for new commands to execute, I could easily do this in about an hour in .NET and just a few lines of code. InIn C/C++, this would be a lot more work, no?

Why aren't sophisticated Malware written with .NET

I've been trying to research malware techniques lately, as malware analysis intrigues me. I've got a pretty heavy background in .NET, and based on my 7+ years in .NET, I feel that I could write a pretty complex piece of malware rather quickly if I was so inclined. Everything that I've seen suggests that malware written in .NET is for the "simple" or "unsophisticated" pieces of malware, why is that?

Obviously, I understand the differences between .NET and C/C++ in regards to the low level stuff. I also understand that .NET is much more easily reversible than C/C++, but still, I would think the benefit outweighs the cost here. Isn't it much quicker to write malware using .NET than C/C++? Especially now that all Win7 PCs ship with the .NET framework already installed.

Other than the "low level stuff", is there a reason that malware authors avoid .NET and use C/C++ instead that I'm not aware of? Why does it appear that in the underground "hacker" forums, everybody despises .NET?

For example, if I wanted to make a program that regularly checked a twitter account for new commands to execute, I could easily do this in about an hour in .NET and just a few lines of code. In C/C++, this would be a lot more work, no?

Why isn't sophisticated malware written with .NET?

I've been trying to research malware techniques lately, as malware analysis intrigues me. I've got a pretty heavy background in .NET, and based on my more than seven years experience in .NET, I feel that I could write a pretty complex piece of malware rather quickly if I was so inclined. Everything that I've seen suggests that malware written in .NET is for the "simple" or "unsophisticated" pieces of malware, why is that?

Obviously, I understand the differences between .NET and C/C++ in regards to the low level stuff. I also understand that .NET is much more easily reversible than C/C++, but still, I would think the benefit outweighs the cost here. Isn't it much quicker to write malware using .NET than C/C++? Especially now that all Windows 7 PCs ship with the .NET framework already installed.

Other than the "low level stuff", is there a reason that malware authors avoid .NET and use C/C++ instead that I'm not aware of? Why does it appear that in the underground "hacker" forums, everybody despises .NET?

For example, if I wanted to make a program that regularly checked a Twitter account for new commands to execute, I could easily do this in about an hour in .NET and just a few lines of code. In C/C++, this would be a lot more work, no?

    Post Closed as "primarily opinion-based" by Lucas Kauffman, Polynomial, Adi, Iszi, TildalWave
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source | link

Why aren't sophisticated Malware written with .NET

I've been trying to research malware techniques lately, as malware analysis intrigues me. I've got a pretty heavy background in .NET, and based on my 7+ years in .NET, I feel that I could write a pretty complex piece of malware rather quickly if I was so inclined. Everything that I've seen suggests that malware written in .NET is for the "simple" or "unsophisticated" pieces of malware, why is that?

Obviously, I understand the differences between .NET and C/C++ in regards to the low level stuff. I also understand that .NET is much more easily reversible than C/C++, but still, I would think the benefit outweighs the cost here. Isn't it much quicker to write malware using .NET than C/C++? Especially now that all Win7 PCs ship with the .NET framework already installed.

Other than the "low level stuff", is there a reason that malware authors avoid .NET and use C/C++ instead that I'm not aware of? Why does it appear that in the underground "hacker" forums, everybody despises .NET?

For example, if I wanted to make a program that regularly checked a twitter account for new commands to execute, I could easily do this in about an hour in .NET and just a few lines of code. In C/C++, this would be a lot more work, no?