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There are a few ways a DDoS can help in perpetrating extra villainies:

  • If the DDoS target is a security service (e.g. an intrusion detection system), then deactivating the service can allow easier break-ins. For instance, if a hole is found in an operating system, which allows for remote code execution, then a DDoS on the OS vendor's update site will delay propagation of the fix, thus allowing for a longer exploitation window.

  • The DDoS itself is likely to generate tons of logs which will make detection of malicious non-DDoS actions harder: log entries which would normally trigger alarms fly under the radar, because the IDS and the people who look after it are overwhelmed by the DDoS-related flow.

  • Since a DDoS threatens the continuity of business activities, some organization may apply emergency procedures which aim at maintaining the service at the possible expense of security. For instance, if a DDoS implies an overload of an email-antivirus, then the organization may decide to switch off the antivirus, so that emails flow again; but then, virus may enter more easily. Another case is an organization who switches to an alternate site which might not be as well protected.

See this previous questionthis previous question on the same subject.

There are a few ways a DDoS can help in perpetrating extra villainies:

  • If the DDoS target is a security service (e.g. an intrusion detection system), then deactivating the service can allow easier break-ins. For instance, if a hole is found in an operating system, which allows for remote code execution, then a DDoS on the OS vendor's update site will delay propagation of the fix, thus allowing for a longer exploitation window.

  • The DDoS itself is likely to generate tons of logs which will make detection of malicious non-DDoS actions harder: log entries which would normally trigger alarms fly under the radar, because the IDS and the people who look after it are overwhelmed by the DDoS-related flow.

  • Since a DDoS threatens the continuity of business activities, some organization may apply emergency procedures which aim at maintaining the service at the possible expense of security. For instance, if a DDoS implies an overload of an email-antivirus, then the organization may decide to switch off the antivirus, so that emails flow again; but then, virus may enter more easily. Another case is an organization who switches to an alternate site which might not be as well protected.

See this previous question on the same subject.

There are a few ways a DDoS can help in perpetrating extra villainies:

  • If the DDoS target is a security service (e.g. an intrusion detection system), then deactivating the service can allow easier break-ins. For instance, if a hole is found in an operating system, which allows for remote code execution, then a DDoS on the OS vendor's update site will delay propagation of the fix, thus allowing for a longer exploitation window.

  • The DDoS itself is likely to generate tons of logs which will make detection of malicious non-DDoS actions harder: log entries which would normally trigger alarms fly under the radar, because the IDS and the people who look after it are overwhelmed by the DDoS-related flow.

  • Since a DDoS threatens the continuity of business activities, some organization may apply emergency procedures which aim at maintaining the service at the possible expense of security. For instance, if a DDoS implies an overload of an email-antivirus, then the organization may decide to switch off the antivirus, so that emails flow again; but then, virus may enter more easily. Another case is an organization who switches to an alternate site which might not be as well protected.

See this previous question on the same subject.

1
source | link

There are a few ways a DDoS can help in perpetrating extra villainies:

  • If the DDoS target is a security service (e.g. an intrusion detection system), then deactivating the service can allow easier break-ins. For instance, if a hole is found in an operating system, which allows for remote code execution, then a DDoS on the OS vendor's update site will delay propagation of the fix, thus allowing for a longer exploitation window.

  • The DDoS itself is likely to generate tons of logs which will make detection of malicious non-DDoS actions harder: log entries which would normally trigger alarms fly under the radar, because the IDS and the people who look after it are overwhelmed by the DDoS-related flow.

  • Since a DDoS threatens the continuity of business activities, some organization may apply emergency procedures which aim at maintaining the service at the possible expense of security. For instance, if a DDoS implies an overload of an email-antivirus, then the organization may decide to switch off the antivirus, so that emails flow again; but then, virus may enter more easily. Another case is an organization who switches to an alternate site which might not be as well protected.

See this previous question on the same subject.