Tweeted twitter.com/#!/StackSecurity/status/82408774672977920
3 added 43 characters in body
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I can put characters in my password for which there are no keys on a keyboard. On Windows, Alt+#### (with the numpad) inserts the character for whatever code you type in.

When I put this in a password, does it pretty much guarantee that it will never be brute forced? I'm probably not the first to think of this, but am I right in guessing that attackers will never consider it worth their time to check non-keyboard characters? Is this even something they are aware of?

If that is the case, with a single non-keyboard character somewhere in your password you'd never have to worry about keeping the rest of the password strong.

I can put characters in my password for which there are no keys on a keyboard. On Windows, Alt+#### (with the numpad) inserts the character for whatever code you type in.

When I put this in a password, does it pretty much guarantee that it will never be brute forced? I'm probably not the first to think of this, but am I right in guessing that attackers will never consider it worth their time to check non-keyboard characters?

If that is the case, with a single non-keyboard character somewhere in your password you'd never have to worry about keeping the rest of the password strong.

I can put characters in my password for which there are no keys on a keyboard. On Windows, Alt+#### (with the numpad) inserts the character for whatever code you type in.

When I put this in a password, does it pretty much guarantee that it will never be brute forced? I'm probably not the first to think of this, but am I right in guessing that attackers will never consider it worth their time to check non-keyboard characters? Is this even something they are aware of?

If that is the case, with a single non-keyboard character somewhere in your password you'd never have to worry about keeping the rest of the password strong.

2 Nothing can be immune.
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Do non-keyboard characters make my password immuneless susceptible to brute forcing?

1
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Do non-keyboard characters make my password immune to brute forcing?

I can put characters in my password for which there are no keys on a keyboard. On Windows, Alt+#### (with the numpad) inserts the character for whatever code you type in.

When I put this in a password, does it pretty much guarantee that it will never be brute forced? I'm probably not the first to think of this, but am I right in guessing that attackers will never consider it worth their time to check non-keyboard characters?

If that is the case, with a single non-keyboard character somewhere in your password you'd never have to worry about keeping the rest of the password strong.