4 fixed typo
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Is isit typical to create both x509 and OpenPGP key pairs?

3 replaced http://crypto.stackexchange.com/ with https://crypto.stackexchange.com/
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I'm looking into increasing my use of signed and encrypted "things" - LibreOffice Documents, Off-the-record chat, PDFs, emails, etc. I'm finding that some things only support x509 format-certificates, and others only support OpenPGP format-certificates.

I also like that OpenPGP is not CA-dependent, and dislike that the CA model is vulnerable to government interference. However, the CA model is convenient in certain use cases (e.g. Emailing a signed PDF to an old, wizened academic who knows nothing about encryption).

I thought about creating a Frankensteinian x509/OpenPGP hybridFrankensteinian x509/OpenPGP hybrid from the same key pair, but I'm not sure if it's worth the trouble.

So I think the question is: Is it advisable to own and maintain two key pairs - one in x.509 format, and the other in OpenPGP?

I'm looking into increasing my use of signed and encrypted "things" - LibreOffice Documents, Off-the-record chat, PDFs, emails, etc. I'm finding that some things only support x509 format-certificates, and others only support OpenPGP format-certificates.

I also like that OpenPGP is not CA-dependent, and dislike that the CA model is vulnerable to government interference. However, the CA model is convenient in certain use cases (e.g. Emailing a signed PDF to an old, wizened academic who knows nothing about encryption).

I thought about creating a Frankensteinian x509/OpenPGP hybrid from the same key pair, but I'm not sure if it's worth the trouble.

So I think the question is: Is it advisable to own and maintain two key pairs - one in x.509 format, and the other in OpenPGP?

I'm looking into increasing my use of signed and encrypted "things" - LibreOffice Documents, Off-the-record chat, PDFs, emails, etc. I'm finding that some things only support x509 format-certificates, and others only support OpenPGP format-certificates.

I also like that OpenPGP is not CA-dependent, and dislike that the CA model is vulnerable to government interference. However, the CA model is convenient in certain use cases (e.g. Emailing a signed PDF to an old, wizened academic who knows nothing about encryption).

I thought about creating a Frankensteinian x509/OpenPGP hybrid from the same key pair, but I'm not sure if it's worth the trouble.

So I think the question is: Is it advisable to own and maintain two key pairs - one in x.509 format, and the other in OpenPGP?

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