2 I hope this is clearer.
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HTTPS is an end-to-end encrypted connection

The key hereThat is that while, yestrue, HTTPSbut it in the Tor model the actual TCP connection is not "end-to-end", in this sense.

The way I have interpreted your question is that you imagine an [unsecured] HTTP session to be protected by Tor by rewriting packets in order to hide your IP. If true, the introduction of SSL to the mix would render Tor model you areunable to read, let alone rewrite your packets.

However the key here is that this is not one of those endshow Tor works. One of their serversIn the Tor model, responsibility for the connection is left to the final Tor device in the chain; the SSL session still begins on your computer, so you're still secured end-to-end, but there is no need for any "rewriting" to take place anyway, so there is nothing lost by applying SSL to the payloads.

The key here is that while, yes, HTTPS is "end-to-end", in the Tor model you are not one of those ends. One of their servers is.

HTTPS is an end-to-end encrypted connection

That is true, but it in the Tor model the actual TCP connection is not "end-to-end" in this sense.

The way I have interpreted your question is that you imagine an [unsecured] HTTP session to be protected by Tor by rewriting packets in order to hide your IP. If true, the introduction of SSL to the mix would render Tor unable to read, let alone rewrite your packets.

However the key here is that this is not how Tor works. In the Tor model, responsibility for the connection is left to the final Tor device in the chain; the SSL session still begins on your computer, so you're still secured end-to-end, but there is no need for any "rewriting" to take place anyway, so there is nothing lost by applying SSL to the payloads.

1
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The key here is that while, yes, HTTPS is "end-to-end", in the Tor model you are not one of those ends. One of their servers is.