4 added 359 characters in body
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From a purely technical viewpoint one could say that any data which can be accessed in some way is public, because technology doesn't make a difference between features and bugs. But laws are rarely that technical.

Legislation about what's illegal hacking and what isn't vary a lot around the world. I am not a lawyer, but as far as I know, many legislations consider data to be private when the owner of the system took steps to prevent public access. Should these steps turn out to be insufficient due to a software bug, accessing it is still illegal when the person who accesses them has no reason to believe that the data is supposed to be public.

When someone writes on their homepage "I set up a public MySQL database for everyone to experiment with, username is 'user'user and password is 'pass'"pass", it is reasonable to assume that any information in that database is public. When you have to exploit a security vulnerability in a software they use to obtain the login information, it is reasonable to assume that the information is not meant to be public.

From a purely technical viewpoint one could say that any data which can be accessed in some way is public, because technology doesn't make a difference between features and bugs. But laws are rarely that technical.

Legislation about what's illegal hacking and what isn't vary a lot around the world. I am not a lawyer, but as far as I know, many legislations consider data to be private when the owner of the system took steps to prevent public access. Should these steps turn out to be insufficient due to a software bug, accessing it is still illegal when the person who accesses them has no reason to believe that the data is supposed to be public.

When someone writes on their homepage "I set up a public MySQL database for everyone to experiment with, username is 'user' and password is 'pass'", it is reasonable to assume that any information in that database is public. When you have to exploit a security vulnerability in a software they use to obtain the login information, it is reasonable to assume that the information is not meant to be public.

From a purely technical viewpoint one could say that any data which can be accessed in some way is public, because technology doesn't make a difference between features and bugs. But laws are rarely that technical.

Legislation about what's illegal hacking and what isn't vary a lot around the world. I am not a lawyer, but as far as I know, many legislations consider data to be private when the owner of the system took steps to prevent public access. Should these steps turn out to be insufficient due to a software bug, accessing it is still illegal when the person who accesses them has no reason to believe that the data is supposed to be public.

When someone writes on their homepage "I set up a public MySQL database for everyone to experiment with, username is user and password is pass", it is reasonable to assume that any information in that database is public. When you have to exploit a security vulnerability in a software they use to obtain the login information, it is reasonable to assume that the information is not meant to be public.

3 added 359 characters in body
source | link

From a purely technical viewpoint one could say that any data which can be accessed in some way is public, because technology doesn't make a difference between features and bugs. But laws are rarely that technical.

Legislation about what's illegal hacking and what isn't vary a lot around the world. I am not a lawyer, but as far as I know, many legislations consider data to be private when the owner of the system took steps to prevent public access. Should these steps turn out to be insufficient due to a software bug, accessing it is still illegal when the person who accesses them has no reason to believe that the data is supposed to be public.

When someone writes on their homepage "I set up a public MySQL database for everyone to experiment with, username is 'user' and password is 'pass'", it is reasonable to assume that any information in that database is public. When you have to exploit a security vulnerability in a software they use to obtain the login information, it is reasonable to assume that the information is not meant to be public.

From a purely technical viewpoint one could say that any data which can be accessed in some way is public, because technology doesn't make a difference between features and bugs. But laws are rarely that technical.

Legislation about what's illegal hacking and what isn't vary a lot around the world. I am not a lawyer, but as far as I know, many legislations consider data to be private when the owner of the system took steps to prevent public access. Should these steps turn out to be insufficient due to a software bug, accessing it is still illegal when the person who accesses them has no reason to believe that the data is supposed to be public.

From a purely technical viewpoint one could say that any data which can be accessed in some way is public, because technology doesn't make a difference between features and bugs. But laws are rarely that technical.

Legislation about what's illegal hacking and what isn't vary a lot around the world. I am not a lawyer, but as far as I know, many legislations consider data to be private when the owner of the system took steps to prevent public access. Should these steps turn out to be insufficient due to a software bug, accessing it is still illegal when the person who accesses them has no reason to believe that the data is supposed to be public.

When someone writes on their homepage "I set up a public MySQL database for everyone to experiment with, username is 'user' and password is 'pass'", it is reasonable to assume that any information in that database is public. When you have to exploit a security vulnerability in a software they use to obtain the login information, it is reasonable to assume that the information is not meant to be public.

2 Fixed a typo.
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From a purely technical viewpoint one could say that any data which can be accessed in some way is public, because technology doesn't make a difference between features and bugs. But laws are rarely that technical.

Legislation about what's illegal hacking and what isn't vary a lot around the world. I am not a lawyserlawyer, but as far as I know, many legislations consider data to be private when the owner of the system took steps to prevent public access. Should these steps turn out to be inefficient because ofinsufficient due to a software bug, accessing it is still illegal when the person who accesses them has no reason to believe that the data is supposed to be public.

From a purely technical viewpoint one could say that any data which can be accessed in some way is public, because technology doesn't make a difference between features and bugs. But laws are rarely that technical.

Legislation about what's illegal hacking and what isn't vary a lot around the world. I am not a lawyser, but as far as I know, many legislations consider data to be private when the owner of the system took steps to prevent public access. Should these steps turn out to be inefficient because of a software bug, accessing it is still illegal when the person who accesses them has no reason to believe that the data is supposed to be public.

From a purely technical viewpoint one could say that any data which can be accessed in some way is public, because technology doesn't make a difference between features and bugs. But laws are rarely that technical.

Legislation about what's illegal hacking and what isn't vary a lot around the world. I am not a lawyer, but as far as I know, many legislations consider data to be private when the owner of the system took steps to prevent public access. Should these steps turn out to be insufficient due to a software bug, accessing it is still illegal when the person who accesses them has no reason to believe that the data is supposed to be public.

1
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