4 clarify
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"Real" glass terminals had an escape sequence to print the screen to a printer. They did this by running a command and pipeing the current screen contents to the printer's stdin of the print command.

The command could be configured by another escape sequence.

The classic way of exploiting this was to create files with names that embedded the escape sequence to set the printer command and change it to some script of your choice and then have a 2nd file with the print escape sequence in it.

When someone then ran ls in that directory they would end up running your code. Which was nice if they were the root user!

In theory modern terminal emulators shouldn't do that kind of thing any more.

Terminal.app appears to be based on the NextStep nsterm, so it may have all kinds of weirdness in it.

Maybe try narrowing down which exact bytes are producing the command not found messages?

Looks like there are escape sequences to raise and lower the terminal:

http://the.taoofmac.com/space/apps/Terminal

some more info here:

http://invisible-island.net/ncurses/terminfo.src.html#toc-_Apple__Terminal_app

If you want to send content to a program's stdin,

program -para meters < /path/file.ext

"Real" glass terminals had an escape sequence to print the screen to a printer. They did this by running a command and pipeing the current screen contents to the printer's stdin.

The command could be configured by another escape sequence.

The classic way of exploiting this was to create files with names that embedded the escape sequence to set the printer command and change it to some script of your choice and then have a 2nd file with the print escape sequence in it.

When someone then ran ls in that directory they would end up running your code. Which was nice if they were the root user!

In theory modern terminal emulators shouldn't do that kind of thing any more.

Terminal.app appears to be based on the NextStep nsterm, so it may have all kinds of weirdness in it.

Maybe try narrowing down which exact bytes are producing the command not found messages?

Looks like there are escape sequences to raise and lower the terminal:

http://the.taoofmac.com/space/apps/Terminal

some more info here:

http://invisible-island.net/ncurses/terminfo.src.html#toc-_Apple__Terminal_app

If you want to send content to a program's stdin,

program -para meters < /path/file.ext

"Real" glass terminals had an escape sequence to print the screen to a printer. They did this by running a command and pipeing the current screen contents to the stdin of the print command.

The command could be configured by another escape sequence.

The classic way of exploiting this was to create files with names that embedded the escape sequence to set the printer command and change it to some script of your choice and then have a 2nd file with the print escape sequence in it.

When someone then ran ls in that directory they would end up running your code. Which was nice if they were the root user!

In theory modern terminal emulators shouldn't do that kind of thing any more.

Terminal.app appears to be based on the NextStep nsterm, so it may have all kinds of weirdness in it.

Maybe try narrowing down which exact bytes are producing the command not found messages?

Looks like there are escape sequences to raise and lower the terminal:

http://the.taoofmac.com/space/apps/Terminal

some more info here:

http://invisible-island.net/ncurses/terminfo.src.html#toc-_Apple__Terminal_app

If you want to send content to a program's stdin,

program -para meters < /path/file.ext
3 Add info on how stdin works, fixed spelling error
source | link

"Real" glass terminals had an escape sequence to print the screen to a printer. They did this by running a command and pipeing the current screen contents to the printer's stdin.

The command could be configured by another escape sequence.

The classic way of exploiting this was to create files with names that embedded the escape sequence to set the printer command and change it to some script of your choice and then have a 2nd file with the print escape sequence in it.

When someone then ran ls in that directory they would end up running your code. Which was nice if they were the root user!

In theory modern terminal emulators shouldn't do that kind of thing any more.

Terminal.app appears to be based on the NextStep nsterm, so it may have all kinds of wierdnessweirdness in it.

Maybe try narrowing down which exact bytes are producing the command not found messages?

Looks like there are escape sequences to raise and lower the terminal:

http://the.taoofmac.com/space/apps/Terminal

some more info here:

http://invisible-island.net/ncurses/terminfo.src.html#toc-_Apple__Terminal_app

If you want to send content to a program's stdin,

program -para meters < /path/file.ext

"Real" glass terminals had an escape sequence to print the screen to a printer. They did this by running a command and pipeing the current screen contents to the printer's stdin.

The command could be configured by another escape sequence.

The classic way of exploiting this was to create files with names that embedded the escape sequence to set the printer command and change it to some script of your choice and then have a 2nd file with the print escape sequence in it.

When someone then ran ls in that directory they would end up running your code. Which was nice if they were the root user!

In theory modern terminal emulators shouldn't do that kind of thing any more.

Terminal.app appears to be based on the NextStep nsterm, so it may have all kinds of wierdness in it.

Maybe try narrowing down which exact bytes are producing the command not found messages?

Looks like there are escape sequences to raise and lower the terminal:

http://the.taoofmac.com/space/apps/Terminal

some more info here:

http://invisible-island.net/ncurses/terminfo.src.html#toc-_Apple__Terminal_app

"Real" glass terminals had an escape sequence to print the screen to a printer. They did this by running a command and pipeing the current screen contents to the printer's stdin.

The command could be configured by another escape sequence.

The classic way of exploiting this was to create files with names that embedded the escape sequence to set the printer command and change it to some script of your choice and then have a 2nd file with the print escape sequence in it.

When someone then ran ls in that directory they would end up running your code. Which was nice if they were the root user!

In theory modern terminal emulators shouldn't do that kind of thing any more.

Terminal.app appears to be based on the NextStep nsterm, so it may have all kinds of weirdness in it.

Maybe try narrowing down which exact bytes are producing the command not found messages?

Looks like there are escape sequences to raise and lower the terminal:

http://the.taoofmac.com/space/apps/Terminal

some more info here:

http://invisible-island.net/ncurses/terminfo.src.html#toc-_Apple__Terminal_app

If you want to send content to a program's stdin,

program -para meters < /path/file.ext
2 it's should be its
source | link

'Real'"Real" glass terminals had an escape sequence to print the screen to a printer. They did this by running a command and pipeing the current screen contents to it'sthe printer's stdin.

The command could be configured by another escape sequence.

The classic way of exploiting this was to create files with names that embedded the escape sequence to set the printer command and change it to some script of your choice and then have a 2nd file with the print escape sequence in it.

When someone then ran ls in that directory they would end up running your code. Which was nice if they were the root user!

In theory modern terminal emulators shouldn't do that kind of thing any more.

Terminal.app appears to be based on the NextStep nsterm, so it may have all kinds of wierdness in it.

Maybe try narrowing down which exact bytes are producing the command not found messages?

Looks like there are escape sequences to raise and lower the terminal:

http://the.taoofmac.com/space/apps/Terminal

some more info here:

http://invisible-island.net/ncurses/terminfo.src.html#toc-_Apple__Terminal_app

'Real' glass terminals had an escape sequence to print the screen to a printer. They did this by running a command and pipeing the current screen contents to it's stdin.

The command could be configured by another escape sequence.

The classic way of exploiting this was to create files with names that embedded the escape sequence to set the printer command and change it to some script of your choice and then have a 2nd file with the print escape sequence in it.

When someone then ran ls in that directory they would end up running your code. Which was nice if they were the root user!

In theory modern terminal emulators shouldn't do that kind of thing any more.

Terminal.app appears to be based on the NextStep nsterm, so it may have all kinds of wierdness in it.

Maybe try narrowing down which exact bytes are producing the command not found messages?

Looks like there are escape sequences to raise and lower the terminal:

http://the.taoofmac.com/space/apps/Terminal

some more info here:

http://invisible-island.net/ncurses/terminfo.src.html#toc-_Apple__Terminal_app

"Real" glass terminals had an escape sequence to print the screen to a printer. They did this by running a command and pipeing the current screen contents to the printer's stdin.

The command could be configured by another escape sequence.

The classic way of exploiting this was to create files with names that embedded the escape sequence to set the printer command and change it to some script of your choice and then have a 2nd file with the print escape sequence in it.

When someone then ran ls in that directory they would end up running your code. Which was nice if they were the root user!

In theory modern terminal emulators shouldn't do that kind of thing any more.

Terminal.app appears to be based on the NextStep nsterm, so it may have all kinds of wierdness in it.

Maybe try narrowing down which exact bytes are producing the command not found messages?

Looks like there are escape sequences to raise and lower the terminal:

http://the.taoofmac.com/space/apps/Terminal

some more info here:

http://invisible-island.net/ncurses/terminfo.src.html#toc-_Apple__Terminal_app

1
source | link