3 added 51 characters in body
source | link

There are tons of other programming languages that don't have this problem, so there must be a better way to do whatever Java is doing wrong.

That's a pretty high claim, where did you get that impression? There are "tons of other programming languages" that haven't been put through the same paces as Java, or are used as ubiquitously.

In principle, the reason there are so many security patches is because, unlike most languages, Java is intendedwas designed to be secure, with a number of security-focused features that other languages don't have.

The Java Language Environment

1.2.2 Robust and Secure

Java technology is designed to operate in distributed environments, which means that security is of paramount importance. With security features designed into the language and run-time system, Java technology lets you construct applications that can't be invaded from outside. In the network environment, applications written in the Java programming language are secure from intrusion by unauthorized code attempting to get behind the scenes and create viruses or invade file systems.

If you don't include "be secure" in the specifications for your programming language, you'll rarely have to release security patches. If, on the other hand, that's one of your stated goals, you'll be hard pressed not to.

There are tons of other programming languages that don't have this problem, so there must be a better way to do whatever Java is doing wrong.

That's a pretty high claim, where did you get that impression? There are "tons of other programming languages" that haven't been put through the same paces as Java, or are used as ubiquitously.

In principle, the reason there are so many security patches is because, unlike most languages, Java is intended to be secure.

The Java Language Environment

1.2.2 Robust and Secure

Java technology is designed to operate in distributed environments, which means that security is of paramount importance. With security features designed into the language and run-time system, Java technology lets you construct applications that can't be invaded from outside. In the network environment, applications written in the Java programming language are secure from intrusion by unauthorized code attempting to get behind the scenes and create viruses or invade file systems.

If you don't include "be secure" in the specifications for your programming language, you'll rarely have to release security patches. If, on the other hand, that's one of your stated goals, you'll be hard pressed not to.

There are tons of other programming languages that don't have this problem, so there must be a better way to do whatever Java is doing wrong.

That's a pretty high claim, where did you get that impression? There are "tons of other programming languages" that haven't been put through the same paces as Java, or are used as ubiquitously.

In principle, the reason there are so many security patches is because Java was designed to be secure, with a number of security-focused features that other languages don't have.

The Java Language Environment

1.2.2 Robust and Secure

Java technology is designed to operate in distributed environments, which means that security is of paramount importance. With security features designed into the language and run-time system, Java technology lets you construct applications that can't be invaded from outside. In the network environment, applications written in the Java programming language are secure from intrusion by unauthorized code attempting to get behind the scenes and create viruses or invade file systems.

If you don't include "be secure" in the specifications for your programming language, you'll rarely have to release security patches. If, on the other hand, that's one of your stated goals, you'll be hard pressed not to.

2 added 2 characters in body
source | link

There are tons of other programming languages that don't have this problem, so there must be a better way to do whatever Java is doing wrong.

That's a pretty high claim, where did you get that impression? There are tons"tons of other programming languageslanguages" that haven't been put through the same paces as Java, or are used as ubiquitously.

In principle, the reason there are so many security patches is because, unlike most languages, Java is intended to be secure.

The Java Language Environment

1.2.2 Robust and Secure

Java technology is designed to operate in distributed environments, which means that security is of paramount importance. With security features designed into the language and run-time system, Java technology lets you construct applications that can't be invaded from outside. In the network environment, applications written in the Java programming language are secure from intrusion by unauthorized code attempting to get behind the scenes and create viruses or invade file systems.

If you don't include "be secure" in the specifications for your programming language, you'll rarely have to release security patches. If, on the other hand, that's one of your stated goals, you'll be hard pressed not to.

There are tons of other programming languages that don't have this problem, so there must be a better way to do whatever Java is doing wrong.

That's a pretty high claim, where did you get that impression? There are tons of other programming languages that haven't been put through the same paces as Java, or are used as ubiquitously.

In principle, the reason there are so many security patches is because, unlike most languages, Java is intended to be secure.

The Java Language Environment

1.2.2 Robust and Secure

Java technology is designed to operate in distributed environments, which means that security is of paramount importance. With security features designed into the language and run-time system, Java technology lets you construct applications that can't be invaded from outside. In the network environment, applications written in the Java programming language are secure from intrusion by unauthorized code attempting to get behind the scenes and create viruses or invade file systems.

If you don't include "be secure" in the specifications for your programming language, you'll rarely have to release security patches. If, on the other hand, that's one of your stated goals, you'll be hard pressed not to.

There are tons of other programming languages that don't have this problem, so there must be a better way to do whatever Java is doing wrong.

That's a pretty high claim, where did you get that impression? There are "tons of other programming languages" that haven't been put through the same paces as Java, or are used as ubiquitously.

In principle, the reason there are so many security patches is because, unlike most languages, Java is intended to be secure.

The Java Language Environment

1.2.2 Robust and Secure

Java technology is designed to operate in distributed environments, which means that security is of paramount importance. With security features designed into the language and run-time system, Java technology lets you construct applications that can't be invaded from outside. In the network environment, applications written in the Java programming language are secure from intrusion by unauthorized code attempting to get behind the scenes and create viruses or invade file systems.

If you don't include "be secure" in the specifications for your programming language, you'll rarely have to release security patches. If, on the other hand, that's one of your stated goals, you'll be hard pressed not to.

1
source | link

There are tons of other programming languages that don't have this problem, so there must be a better way to do whatever Java is doing wrong.

That's a pretty high claim, where did you get that impression? There are tons of other programming languages that haven't been put through the same paces as Java, or are used as ubiquitously.

In principle, the reason there are so many security patches is because, unlike most languages, Java is intended to be secure.

The Java Language Environment

1.2.2 Robust and Secure

Java technology is designed to operate in distributed environments, which means that security is of paramount importance. With security features designed into the language and run-time system, Java technology lets you construct applications that can't be invaded from outside. In the network environment, applications written in the Java programming language are secure from intrusion by unauthorized code attempting to get behind the scenes and create viruses or invade file systems.

If you don't include "be secure" in the specifications for your programming language, you'll rarely have to release security patches. If, on the other hand, that's one of your stated goals, you'll be hard pressed not to.