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YES, but there is a big chance (depending on region) that aan (internally chip-capable) ATM (depending on region) will reject the card!

The most common 2 problems for an ATM (including chip-capable) to reject a card are:

  • a dirty or scratched magstripe (as shown in spork's answer)
  • an erased or mangled (=invalid) magstripe   
    • by exposure to magnets or EMP (commonly relatively smallthey need to emit a fluxstrength of at least 4000 oersted, so your average refrigerator magnetsmagnet will not work)
    • demagnetizerusing a 'demagnetizer' (like an electronic article surveillance (EAS) de-mag bin, but NOT a 'common' MCC/VHS head 'demagnetizer' since a 2006 rapport showed they usually were so weak they couldn't even wipe a floppy or audio-tape)
    • overwriting it with a high-coercivity (HiCo) writer (using all 1, or 0 or random, optionally repeating it in the same manner (and same reasons) as one youwould DOD-wipe a HD)
      Running strong magnets (r dadalternating their magnetic orientation) useover (spart of) to demagnetize his MC/VHS headsthe magstripe does exactly the same)!

I can confirm effectiveness on all three of the above, but note 2 things:

  • Quite some ATM's don't open their card-slot if they don't detect the start of the magstripe even if they would use the chip (if available) internally!
    (So my vote would go for magnetizing OR leave beginning intact and mangle the remaining +/- 2/3th of the magstripe)
  • again, (depending on country/ATM) the ATM might reject a card with an invalid magstripe according to the manufacturers of SkimProt who sell a special magstripe sticker:
    If the sticker is placed incorrectly or its integrity is damaged, ATMs may not accept the bank card.
    The sticker is:
    A magnetic stripe containing a code, instructing ATMs to use the card’s chip and zeros in place of card information.

All-in-all, some food for thought, to which I want to add that the contact-less problem seriously outweighs this one.
One might want to do some trial and error (don't forget to have some cash or alternative card available) in their regular region BUT one should keep murphy's law in mind: when you unexpectedly need your scrambled magswipe to work (school/field/company -trip etc), it most probably won't.
The skimprot stickers are said to work in 80% of the world, seems supported by spec and best of all: you can remove them in a pinch!  
(My) Logic dictates thus that according to the manufacturer, 80% of the ATM's worldwide have a chipreader available internally, otherwise the animized card's magstripe would not work!

Sidenote: apparently the third (bottom) read/write track (the one that holdsspecified to hold your 'encrypted' pin) is usually not used by the majority of banks (according to some sources like this.

YES, but there is a big chance (depending on region) that a (internally chip-capable) ATM will reject the card!

The most common 2 problems for an ATM (including chip-capable) to reject a card are:

  • a dirty or scratched magstripe
  • an erased magstripe  
    • by exposure to magnets (commonly relatively small refrigerator magnets)
    • demagnetizer (like electronic article surveillance (EAS) or the one you(r dad) use(s) to demagnetize his MC/VHS heads)

I can confirm effectiveness on all three of the above, but note 2 things:

  • Quite some ATM's don't open their card-slot if they don't detect the start of the magstripe even if they would use the chip (if available) internally!
    (So my vote would go for magnetizing OR leave beginning intact and mangle the remaining +/- 2/3th of the magstripe)
  • again, (depending on country/ATM) the ATM might reject a card with an invalid magstripe according to the manufacturers of SkimProt who sell a special magstripe sticker:
    If the sticker is placed incorrectly or its integrity is damaged, ATMs may not accept the bank card.
    The sticker is:
    A magnetic stripe containing a code, instructing ATMs to use the card’s chip and zeros in place of card information.

All-in-all, some food for thought, to which I want to add that the contact-less problem seriously outweighs this one.
One might want to do some trial and error (don't forget to have some cash or alternative card available) in their regular region BUT one should keep murphy's law in mind: when you unexpectedly need your scrambled magswipe to work (school/field/company -trip etc), it most probably won't.
The skimprot stickers are said to work in 80% of the world, seems supported by spec and best of all: you can remove them in a pinch!  

Sidenote: apparently the third (bottom) read/write track (the one that holds your 'encrypted' pin) is usually not used by the majority of banks (according to some sources like this.

YES, but there is a big chance that an (internally chip-capable) ATM (depending on region) will reject the card!

The most common 2 problems for an ATM (including chip-capable) to reject a card are:

  • a dirty or scratched magstripe (as shown in spork's answer)
  • an erased or mangled (=invalid) magstripe  
    • by exposure to magnets or EMP (they need to emit a fluxstrength of at least 4000 oersted, so your average refrigerator magnet will not work)
    • using a 'demagnetizer' (like an electronic article surveillance (EAS) de-mag bin, but NOT a 'common' MCC/VHS head 'demagnetizer' since a 2006 rapport showed they usually were so weak they couldn't even wipe a floppy or audio-tape)
    • overwriting it with a high-coercivity (HiCo) writer (using all 1, or 0 or random, optionally repeating it in the same manner (and same reasons) as one would DOD-wipe a HD)
      Running strong magnets (alternating their magnetic orientation) over (part of) the magstripe does exactly the same)!

I can confirm effectiveness on all three of the above, but note 2 things:

  • Quite some ATM's don't open their card-slot if they don't detect the start of the magstripe even if they would use the chip (if available) internally!
    (So my vote would go for magnetizing OR leave beginning intact and mangle the remaining +/- 2/3th of the magstripe)
  • again, (depending on country/ATM) the ATM might reject a card with an invalid magstripe according to the manufacturers of SkimProt who sell a special magstripe sticker:
    If the sticker is placed incorrectly or its integrity is damaged, ATMs may not accept the bank card.
    The sticker is:
    A magnetic stripe containing a code, instructing ATMs to use the card’s chip and zeros in place of card information.

All-in-all, some food for thought, to which I want to add that the contact-less problem seriously outweighs this one.
One might want to do some trial and error (don't forget to have some cash or alternative card available) in their regular region BUT one should keep murphy's law in mind: when you unexpectedly need your scrambled magswipe to work (school/field/company -trip etc), it most probably won't.
The skimprot stickers are said to work in 80% of the world, seems supported by spec and best of all: you can remove them in a pinch!
(My) Logic dictates thus that according to the manufacturer, 80% of the ATM's worldwide have a chipreader available internally, otherwise the animized card's magstripe would not work!

Sidenote: apparently the third (bottom) read/write track (specified to hold your 'encrypted' pin) is usually not used by the majority of banks.

4 added 137 characters in body
source | link

YES, but there is a big chance (depending on region) that a (internally) chip-enabledcapable) ATM will reject the card!

The most common 2 problems for an ATM (including chip-capable) to reject a card are:

  • a dirty or scratched magstripe
  • an erased magstripe
    • by exposure to magnets (commonly relatively small refrigerator magnets)
    • demagnetizer (like electronic article surveillance (EAS) or the one you(r dad) use(s) to demagnetize his MC/VHS heads)

I can confirm effectiveness on all three of the above, but note 2 things:

  • Quite some ATM's don't open their card-slot if they don't detect the start of the magstripe even if they would use the chip (if available) internally!
    (So my vote would go for magnetizing OR leave beginning intact and mangle the remaining +/- 2/3th of the magstripe)
  • again, (depending on country/ATM) the ATM might reject a card with an invalid magstripe according to the manufacturers of SkimProt who sell a special magstripe sticker:
    If the sticker is placed incorrectly or its integrity is damaged, ATMs may not accept the bank card.
    The sticker is:
    A magnetic stripe containing a code, instructing ATMs to use the card’s chip and zeros in place of card information.

All-in-all, some food for thought, to which I want to add that the contact-less problem seriously outweighs this one.
One might want to do some trial and error (don't forget to have some cash or alternative card available) in their regular region BUT one should keep murphy's law in mind: when you unexpectedly need your scrambled magswipe to work (school/field/company -trip etc), it most probably won't.
The skimprot stickers are said to work in 80% of the world, seems supported by spec and best of all: you can remove them in a pinch! I'm in no way affiliated to them, I only connect & share what I know/read.
Please, for the sake of security, correct me if I'm wrong/forgot something!

Sidenote: apparently the third (bottom) read/write track (the one that holds your 'encrypted' pin) is usually not used by the majority of banks (according to some sources like this.

YES, but there is a big chance (depending on region) that a (internally) chip-enabled ATM will reject the card!

The most common 2 problems for an ATM to reject a card are:

  • a dirty or scratched magstripe
  • an erased magstripe
    • by exposure to magnets (commonly relatively small refrigerator magnets)
    • demagnetizer (like electronic article surveillance (EAS) or the one you(r dad) use(s) to demagnetize his MC/VHS heads)

I can confirm effectiveness on all three of the above, but note 2 things:

  • Quite some ATM's don't open their card-slot if they don't detect the start of the magstripe even if they would use the chip (if available) internally!
    (So my vote would go for magnetizing OR leave beginning intact and mangle the remaining +/- 2/3th of the magstripe)
  • again, (depending on country/ATM) the ATM might reject a card with an invalid magstripe according to the manufacturers of SkimProt who sell a special magstripe sticker:
    If the sticker is placed incorrectly or its integrity is damaged, ATMs may not accept the bank card.
    The sticker is:
    A magnetic stripe containing a code, instructing ATMs to use the card’s chip and zeros in place of card information.

All-in-all, some food for thought, to which I want to add that the contact-less problem seriously outweighs this one.
One might want to do some trial and error (don't forget to have some cash or alternative card available) in their regular region BUT one should keep murphy's law in mind: when you unexpectedly need your scrambled magswipe to work (school/field/company -trip etc), it most probably won't.
The skimprot stickers are said to work in 80% of the world, seems supported by spec and best of all: you can remove them in a pinch! I'm in no way affiliated to them, I only connect & share what I know/read.
Please, for the sake of security, correct me if I'm wrong/forgot something!

Sidenote: apparently the third (bottom) read/write track (the one that holds your 'encrypted' pin) is usually not used by the majority of banks (according to some sources like this.

YES, but there is a big chance (depending on region) that a (internally chip-capable) ATM will reject the card!

The most common 2 problems for an ATM (including chip-capable) to reject a card are:

  • a dirty or scratched magstripe
  • an erased magstripe
    • by exposure to magnets (commonly relatively small refrigerator magnets)
    • demagnetizer (like electronic article surveillance (EAS) or the one you(r dad) use(s) to demagnetize his MC/VHS heads)

I can confirm effectiveness on all three of the above, but note 2 things:

  • Quite some ATM's don't open their card-slot if they don't detect the start of the magstripe even if they would use the chip (if available) internally!
    (So my vote would go for magnetizing OR leave beginning intact and mangle the remaining +/- 2/3th of the magstripe)
  • again, (depending on country/ATM) the ATM might reject a card with an invalid magstripe according to the manufacturers of SkimProt who sell a special magstripe sticker:
    If the sticker is placed incorrectly or its integrity is damaged, ATMs may not accept the bank card.
    The sticker is:
    A magnetic stripe containing a code, instructing ATMs to use the card’s chip and zeros in place of card information.

All-in-all, some food for thought, to which I want to add that the contact-less problem seriously outweighs this one.
One might want to do some trial and error (don't forget to have some cash or alternative card available) in their regular region BUT one should keep murphy's law in mind: when you unexpectedly need your scrambled magswipe to work (school/field/company -trip etc), it most probably won't.
The skimprot stickers are said to work in 80% of the world, seems supported by spec and best of all: you can remove them in a pinch!

Sidenote: apparently the third (bottom) read/write track (the one that holds your 'encrypted' pin) is usually not used by the majority of banks (according to some sources like this.

3 added 137 characters in body
source | link

YES, but there is a big chance (depending on region) that a (internally) chip-enabled ATM will reject the card!

The most common 2 problems for an ATM to reject a card are:

  • a dirty or scratched magstripe
  • an erased magstripe
    • by exposuresexposure to magnets (commonly relatively small refrigerator magnets)
    • demagnetizesdemagnetizer (like electronic article surveillance (EAS) or the one you(r dad) use(s) to demagnetize his MC/VHS heads)

I can confirm effectiveness on all three of the above, but addnote 2 things:

  • Quite some ATM's don't open their card-slot if they don't detect the start of the magstripe even if they would use the chip (if available) internally!
    (So my vote would go for magnetizing OR leave beginning intact and mangle the remaining +/- 2/3th of the magstripe)
  • again, (depending on country/ATM) the ATM might reject a card with an invalid magswipemagstripe according to the manufacturers of SkimProt who sell a special magstripe sticker:
    If the sticker is placed incorrectly or its integrity is damaged, ATMs may not accept the bank card.
    The sticker is:
    A magnetic stripe containing a code, instructing ATMs to use the card’s chip and zeros in place of card information.

All-in-all, some food for thought, to which I want to add that the contact-less problem seriously outweighs this one.
One might want to do some trial and error (don't forget to have some cash or alternative card available) in their regular region BUT one should keep murphy's law in mind: when you unexpectedly need your scrambled magswipe to work (school/field/company -trip etc), it most probably won't.
The skimprot stickers are said to work in 80% of the world, seems supported by spec and best of all: you can remove them in a pinch! I'm in no way affiliated to them, I only connect & share what I know/read.
Please, for the sake of security, correct me if I'm wrong/forgot something!

Sidenote: apparently the third (bottom) read/write track (the one that holds your 'encrypted' pin) is usually not used by the majority of banks (according to some sources like this.

The most common 2 problems for an ATM to reject a card are:

  • a dirty or scratched magstripe
  • an erased magstripe
    • by exposures magnets (commonly relatively small refrigerator magnets)
    • demagnetizes (like electronic article surveillance (EAS) or the one you(r dad) use(s) to demagnetize his MC/VHS heads)

I can confirm all three of the above but add 2 things:

  • Quite some ATM's don't open their card-slot if they don't detect the start of the magstripe even if they would use the chip (if available) internally!
    (So my vote would go for magnetizing OR leave beginning intact and mangle the remaining +/- 2/3th of the magstripe)
  • again, (depending on country/ATM) the ATM might reject a card with an invalid magswipe according to the manufacturers of SkimProt who sell a special magstripe sticker:
    If the sticker is placed incorrectly or its integrity is damaged, ATMs may not accept the bank card.
    The sticker is:
    A magnetic stripe containing a code, instructing ATMs to use the card’s chip and zeros in place of card information.

All-in-all, some food for thought, to which I want to add that the contact-less problem seriously outweighs this one.
One might want to do some trial and error (don't forget to have some cash or alternative card available) in their regular region BUT one should keep murphy's law in mind: when you unexpectedly need your scrambled magswipe to work (school/field/company -trip etc), it most probably won't.
The skimprot stickers are said to work in 80% of the world, seems supported by spec and best of all: you can remove them in a pinch! I'm in no way affiliated to them, I only connect & share what I know/read.
Please, for the sake of security, correct me if I'm wrong/forgot something!

Sidenote: apparently the third (bottom) read/write track (the one that holds your 'encrypted' pin) is usually not used by the majority of banks (according to some sources like this.

YES, but there is a big chance (depending on region) that a (internally) chip-enabled ATM will reject the card!

The most common 2 problems for an ATM to reject a card are:

  • a dirty or scratched magstripe
  • an erased magstripe
    • by exposure to magnets (commonly relatively small refrigerator magnets)
    • demagnetizer (like electronic article surveillance (EAS) or the one you(r dad) use(s) to demagnetize his MC/VHS heads)

I can confirm effectiveness on all three of the above, but note 2 things:

  • Quite some ATM's don't open their card-slot if they don't detect the start of the magstripe even if they would use the chip (if available) internally!
    (So my vote would go for magnetizing OR leave beginning intact and mangle the remaining +/- 2/3th of the magstripe)
  • again, (depending on country/ATM) the ATM might reject a card with an invalid magstripe according to the manufacturers of SkimProt who sell a special magstripe sticker:
    If the sticker is placed incorrectly or its integrity is damaged, ATMs may not accept the bank card.
    The sticker is:
    A magnetic stripe containing a code, instructing ATMs to use the card’s chip and zeros in place of card information.

All-in-all, some food for thought, to which I want to add that the contact-less problem seriously outweighs this one.
One might want to do some trial and error (don't forget to have some cash or alternative card available) in their regular region BUT one should keep murphy's law in mind: when you unexpectedly need your scrambled magswipe to work (school/field/company -trip etc), it most probably won't.
The skimprot stickers are said to work in 80% of the world, seems supported by spec and best of all: you can remove them in a pinch! I'm in no way affiliated to them, I only connect & share what I know/read.
Please, for the sake of security, correct me if I'm wrong/forgot something!

Sidenote: apparently the third (bottom) read/write track (the one that holds your 'encrypted' pin) is usually not used by the majority of banks (according to some sources like this.

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