2 edited body
source | link

To answer the jestgist of your questions, the average user cannot simply track your physical location by your mobile IP address.

The way mobile IP addresses are assigned is a bit different than you may think. Basically, a mobile phone accesses the internet through a sort of VPN provided by the cellular provider. This paper explains why mobile IP address location (an pretty much any indirect geolocation) is not possible for smartphones (yet?).

However, there are two big caveats to this no. The first is that if you have legal justification, you can access a great amount of information that you may be able to piece together to geolocate a phone. This is because there are logs all along the way tying phones to towers and thus locations (however there are ways to spoof even that).

The second caveat is that unauthorised access is not unheard of. If a hacker was able to install malware on the target's phone -bam- the sky is the limit! Moreover, a hacker could theoretically breach any system within the process and access the logs (to inlcude your own computer -which may have a backup of your phone's logs).

It is worth noting that you can program a website to get the smartphones physical location. The most common method is the HTML5 geolocation method but note that this in non-discreet as noted “User Agents must not send location information to Web sites without the express permission of the user.”

It is also worth noting that general IP address lookups only provide you (the general public) with a location of the registered ISP. Thus even if you did have the 'real' IP address, you would still only get a very general location (and sometimes not even that).

To answer the jest of your questions, the average user cannot simply track your physical location by your mobile IP address.

The way mobile IP addresses are assigned is a bit different than you may think. Basically, a mobile phone accesses the internet through a sort of VPN provided by the cellular provider. This paper explains why mobile IP address location (an pretty much any indirect geolocation) is not possible for smartphones (yet?).

However, there are two big caveats to this no. The first is that if you have legal justification, you can access a great amount of information that you may be able to piece together to geolocate a phone. This is because there are logs all along the way tying phones to towers and thus locations (however there are ways to spoof even that).

The second caveat is that unauthorised access is not unheard of. If a hacker was able to install malware on the target's phone -bam- the sky is the limit! Moreover, a hacker could theoretically breach any system within the process and access the logs (to inlcude your own computer -which may have a backup of your phone's logs).

It is worth noting that you can program a website to get the smartphones physical location. The most common method is the HTML5 geolocation method but note that this in non-discreet as noted “User Agents must not send location information to Web sites without the express permission of the user.”

It is also worth noting that general IP address lookups only provide you (the general public) with a location of the registered ISP. Thus even if you did have the 'real' IP address, you would still only get a very general location (and sometimes not even that).

To answer the gist of your questions, the average user cannot simply track your physical location by your mobile IP address.

The way mobile IP addresses are assigned is a bit different than you may think. Basically, a mobile phone accesses the internet through a sort of VPN provided by the cellular provider. This paper explains why mobile IP address location (an pretty much any indirect geolocation) is not possible for smartphones (yet?).

However, there are two big caveats to this no. The first is that if you have legal justification, you can access a great amount of information that you may be able to piece together to geolocate a phone. This is because there are logs all along the way tying phones to towers and thus locations (however there are ways to spoof even that).

The second caveat is that unauthorised access is not unheard of. If a hacker was able to install malware on the target's phone -bam- the sky is the limit! Moreover, a hacker could theoretically breach any system within the process and access the logs (to inlcude your own computer -which may have a backup of your phone's logs).

It is worth noting that you can program a website to get the smartphones physical location. The most common method is the HTML5 geolocation method but note that this in non-discreet as noted “User Agents must not send location information to Web sites without the express permission of the user.”

It is also worth noting that general IP address lookups only provide you (the general public) with a location of the registered ISP. Thus even if you did have the 'real' IP address, you would still only get a very general location (and sometimes not even that).

1
source | link

To answer the jest of your questions, the average user cannot simply track your physical location by your mobile IP address.

The way mobile IP addresses are assigned is a bit different than you may think. Basically, a mobile phone accesses the internet through a sort of VPN provided by the cellular provider. This paper explains why mobile IP address location (an pretty much any indirect geolocation) is not possible for smartphones (yet?).

However, there are two big caveats to this no. The first is that if you have legal justification, you can access a great amount of information that you may be able to piece together to geolocate a phone. This is because there are logs all along the way tying phones to towers and thus locations (however there are ways to spoof even that).

The second caveat is that unauthorised access is not unheard of. If a hacker was able to install malware on the target's phone -bam- the sky is the limit! Moreover, a hacker could theoretically breach any system within the process and access the logs (to inlcude your own computer -which may have a backup of your phone's logs).

It is worth noting that you can program a website to get the smartphones physical location. The most common method is the HTML5 geolocation method but note that this in non-discreet as noted “User Agents must not send location information to Web sites without the express permission of the user.”

It is also worth noting that general IP address lookups only provide you (the general public) with a location of the registered ISP. Thus even if you did have the 'real' IP address, you would still only get a very general location (and sometimes not even that).