3 deleted 3 characters in body
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There are 2 main reasons that makeswhy cookies are easier to steal than login credentials:

Cookies are sent for every request, login credentials isare only sent once for each "session"

If you sniff a network, it is less likely that you will be in place at the point when a user actually perform a login using its username and password.

Cookies on the other hand, are sent for each request to the web server. It is just more likely that you will be able to capture a session cookie than a username/password autentication.

It is hard to predict which GET/POST parameters that contains login credentials

Sniffing the actual authentication credentials on the web can be a bit tricky. This is because virtually every web application have its own way of doing it. It is hard to anticipate all the various authentication URL's.

For example:

GET /login?username=dogeatcatworld&password=letmein
GET /auth?u=dogeatcatworld&p=letmein
GET /auth?auth=<base64encoded credentials>

Cookies on the othe hand, always exist in the HTTP header, and it is trivial to extract these from the requests.

There are 2 main reasons that makes cookies easier to steal than login credentials:

Cookies are sent for every request, login credentials is only sent once for each "session"

If you sniff a network, it is less likely that you will be in place at the point when a user actually perform a login using its username and password.

Cookies on the other hand, are sent for each request to the web server. It is just more likely that you will be able to capture a session cookie than a username/password autentication.

It is hard to predict which GET/POST parameters that contains login credentials

Sniffing the actual authentication credentials on the web can be a bit tricky. This is because virtually every web application have its own way of doing it. It is hard to anticipate all the various authentication URL's.

For example:

GET /login?username=dogeatcatworld&password=letmein
GET /auth?u=dogeatcatworld&p=letmein
GET /auth?auth=<base64encoded credentials>

Cookies on the othe hand, always exist in the HTTP header, and it is trivial to extract these from the requests.

There are 2 main reasons why cookies are easier to steal than login credentials:

Cookies are sent for every request, login credentials are only sent once for each "session"

If you sniff a network, it is less likely that you will be in place at the point when a user actually perform a login using its username and password.

Cookies on the other hand, are sent for each request to the web server. It is just more likely that you will be able to capture a session cookie than a username/password autentication.

It is hard to predict which GET/POST parameters that contains login credentials

Sniffing the actual authentication credentials on the web can be a bit tricky. This is because virtually every web application have its own way of doing it. It is hard to anticipate all the various authentication URL's.

For example:

GET /login?username=dogeatcatworld&password=letmein
GET /auth?u=dogeatcatworld&p=letmein
GET /auth?auth=<base64encoded credentials>

Cookies on the othe hand, always exist in the HTTP header, and it is trivial to extract these from the requests.

2 I am a point whore, and improved my answer in hope to get to 3000 reputation quicklier.
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There are 2 main reasons that makes cookies easier to steal than login credentials:

Cookies are sent for every request, login credentials is only sent once for each "session"

If you sniff a network, it is less likely that you will be in place at the point when a user actually perform a login using its username and password.

Cookies on the other hand, isare sent for each request to the web server. It is just more likely that you will be able to capture a session cookie than ana username/password autentication.

Most sniffers -do- also capture username and passwords, butIt is hard to predict which GET/POST parameters that contains login credentials

Sniffing the actual authentication credentials on the web can be a bit tricky. This is because virtually every web application have its own way of doing it. It is not easyhard to generically determine what parts ofanticipate all the requests that are username and passwordsvarious authentication URL's.

For example:

GET /login?username=dogeatcatworld&password=letmein
GET /auth?u=dogeatcatworld&p=letmein
GET /auth?auth=<base64encoded credentials>

Cookies are always easy to captureon the othe hand, as they only existsalways exist in the HTTP Headerheader, and it is trivial to extract these from the requests.

If you sniff a network, it is less likely that you will be in place at the point when a user actually perform a login using its username and password.

Cookies on the other hand, is sent for each request to the web server. It is just more likely that you will be able to capture a session cookie than an username/password autentication.

Most sniffers -do- also capture username and passwords, but it is not easy to generically determine what parts of the requests that are username and passwords. Cookies are always easy to capture, as they only exists in the HTTP Header.

There are 2 main reasons that makes cookies easier to steal than login credentials:

Cookies are sent for every request, login credentials is only sent once for each "session"

If you sniff a network, it is less likely that you will be in place at the point when a user actually perform a login using its username and password.

Cookies on the other hand, are sent for each request to the web server. It is just more likely that you will be able to capture a session cookie than a username/password autentication.

It is hard to predict which GET/POST parameters that contains login credentials

Sniffing the actual authentication credentials on the web can be a bit tricky. This is because virtually every web application have its own way of doing it. It is hard to anticipate all the various authentication URL's.

For example:

GET /login?username=dogeatcatworld&password=letmein
GET /auth?u=dogeatcatworld&p=letmein
GET /auth?auth=<base64encoded credentials>

Cookies on the othe hand, always exist in the HTTP header, and it is trivial to extract these from the requests.

1
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If you sniff a network, it is less likely that you will be in place at the point when a user actually perform a login using its username and password.

Cookies on the other hand, is sent for each request to the web server. It is just more likely that you will be able to capture a session cookie than an username/password autentication.

Most sniffers -do- also capture username and passwords, but it is not easy to generically determine what parts of the requests that are username and passwords. Cookies are always easy to capture, as they only exists in the HTTP Header.