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Yes, there's a classic attack that involves incremental access.

The attacker starts out with a blank key and a lighter (or candle, or similar). Before visiting the door, he uses the lighter to put a thin layer of soot on the top edge ofthat fits into the blank keylock in question.

The attacker approaches the door, puts the key in, jiggles the key a bit, grumbles something about how the office numbers changing, and leaves.

Then in private he examines the scratchimpression pattern on the key. Where there's evidence that the pins were bound, he files the key down a bit. Every day he visits the door with his sootincreasingly-preparedfiled-down key, and every day he progressively files it down a bit more, using the scratchimpression pattern in the sootkey as his guide.

Then, one day, he'll have filed the key to match all of the pins, and the door will open.

This attack has the advantage that it doesn't look like an attack. It just looks like a lost tenant who briefly visits the wrong door, and then leaves once he's realized his mistake. And when he's done, he'll have a working key.

Yes, there's a classic attack that involves incremental access.

The attacker starts out with a blank key and a lighter (or candle, or similar). Before visiting the door, he uses the lighter to put a thin layer of soot on the top edge of the blank key.

The attacker approaches the door, puts the key in, jiggles the key a bit, grumbles something about how the office numbers changing, and leaves.

Then in private he examines the scratch pattern on the key. Where there's evidence that the pins were bound, he files the key down a bit. Every day he visits the door with his soot-prepared key, and every day he progressively files it down a bit more, using the scratch pattern in the soot as his guide.

Then, one day, he'll have filed the key to match all of the pins, and the door will open.

This attack has the advantage that it doesn't look like an attack. It just looks like a lost tenant who briefly visits the wrong door, and then leaves once he's realized his mistake. And when he's done, he'll have a working key.

Yes, there's a classic attack that involves incremental access.

The attacker starts out with a blank key that fits into the lock in question.

The attacker approaches the door, puts the key in, jiggles the key a bit, grumbles something about how the office numbers changing, and leaves.

Then in private he examines the impression pattern on the key. Where there's evidence that the pins were bound, he files the key down a bit. Every day he visits the door with his increasingly-filed-down key, and every day he progressively files it down a bit more, using the impression pattern in the key as his guide.

Then, one day, he'll have filed the key to match all of the pins, and the door will open.

This attack has the advantage that it doesn't look like an attack. It just looks like a lost tenant who briefly visits the wrong door, and then leaves once he's realized his mistake. And when he's done, he'll have a working key.

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Yes, there's a classic attackthere's a classic attack that involves incremental access.

The attacker starts out with a blank key and a lighter (or candle, or similar). Before visiting the door, he uses the lighter to put a thin layer of soot on the top edge of the blank key.

The attacker approaches the door, puts the key in, jiggles the key left and right a bit, grumbles something about how the office numbers changing, and leaves.

Then in private he examines the scratch pattern on the key. Where there's evidence that the pins were bound, he files the key down a bit, and where there's evidence that the pins are aligned with the shear line, he leaves the key as-is.

  Every day he visits the door with his soot-prepared key, and every day he progressively files it down a bit more, using the scratch pattern in the soot as his guide.

Then, one day, he'll have filed the key to match all of the pins, and the door will open.

This attack has the advantage that it doesn't look like an attack. It just looks like a lost tenant who briefly visits the wrong door, and then leaves once he's realized his mistake. And when he's done, he'll have a working key.

Yes, there's a classic attack that involves incremental access.

The attacker starts out with a blank key and a lighter (or candle, or similar). Before visiting the door, he uses the lighter to put a thin layer of soot on the top edge of the blank key.

The attacker approaches the door, puts the key in, jiggles the key left and right a bit, grumbles something about how the office numbers changing, and leaves.

Then in private he examines the scratch pattern on the key. Where there's evidence that the pins were bound, he files the key down a bit, and where there's evidence that the pins are aligned with the shear line, he leaves the key as-is.

  Every day he visits the door with his soot-prepared key, and every day he progressively files it down a bit more, using the scratch pattern in the soot as his guide.

Then, one day, he'll have filed the key to match all of the pins, and the door will open.

This attack has the advantage that it doesn't look like an attack. It just looks like a lost tenant who briefly visits the wrong door, and then leaves once he's realized his mistake. And when he's done, he'll have a working key.

Yes, there's a classic attack that involves incremental access.

The attacker starts out with a blank key and a lighter (or candle, or similar). Before visiting the door, he uses the lighter to put a thin layer of soot on the top edge of the blank key.

The attacker approaches the door, puts the key in, jiggles the key a bit, grumbles something about how the office numbers changing, and leaves.

Then in private he examines the scratch pattern on the key. Where there's evidence that the pins were bound, he files the key down a bit. Every day he visits the door with his soot-prepared key, and every day he progressively files it down a bit more, using the scratch pattern in the soot as his guide.

Then, one day, he'll have filed the key to match all of the pins, and the door will open.

This attack has the advantage that it doesn't look like an attack. It just looks like a lost tenant who briefly visits the wrong door, and then leaves once he's realized his mistake. And when he's done, he'll have a working key.

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Yes, there's a classic attack that involves incremental access.

The attacker starts out with a blank key and a lighter (or candle, or similar). Before visiting the door, he uses the lighter to put a thin layer of soot on the top edge of the blank key.

The attacker approaches the door, puts the key in, jiggles the key left and right a bit, grumbles something about how the office numbers changing, and leaves.

Then in private he examines the scratch pattern on the key. Where there's evidence that the pins were bound, he files the key down a bit, and where there's evidence that the pins were floating free (reduced side-to-side scratching inare aligned with the soot)shear line, he leaves the key as-is.

Every day he visits the door with his soot-prepared key, and every day he progressively files it down a bit more, using the scratch pattern in the soot as his guide.

Then, one day, he'll have filed the key to match all of the pins, and the door will open.

This attack has the advantage that it doesn't look like an attack. It just looks like a lost tenant who briefly visits the wrong door, and then leaves once he's realized his mistake. And when he's done, he'll have a working key.

Yes, there's a classic attack that involves incremental access.

The attacker starts out with a blank key and a lighter (or candle, or similar). Before visiting the door, he uses the lighter to put a thin layer of soot on the top edge of the blank key.

The attacker approaches the door, puts the key in, jiggles the key left and right a bit, grumbles something about how the office numbers changing, and leaves.

Then in private he examines the scratch pattern on the key. Where there's evidence that the pins were bound, he files the key down a bit, and where there's evidence that the pins were floating free (reduced side-to-side scratching in the soot) he leaves the key as-is.

Every day he visits the door with his soot-prepared key, and every day he progressively files it down a bit more, using the scratch pattern in the soot as his guide.

Then, one day, he'll have filed the key to match all of the pins, and the door will open.

This attack has the advantage that it doesn't look like an attack. It just looks like a lost tenant who briefly visits the wrong door, and then leaves once he's realized his mistake. And when he's done, he'll have a working key.

Yes, there's a classic attack that involves incremental access.

The attacker starts out with a blank key and a lighter (or candle, or similar). Before visiting the door, he uses the lighter to put a thin layer of soot on the top edge of the blank key.

The attacker approaches the door, puts the key in, jiggles the key left and right a bit, grumbles something about how the office numbers changing, and leaves.

Then in private he examines the scratch pattern on the key. Where there's evidence that the pins were bound, he files the key down a bit, and where there's evidence that the pins are aligned with the shear line, he leaves the key as-is.

Every day he visits the door with his soot-prepared key, and every day he progressively files it down a bit more, using the scratch pattern in the soot as his guide.

Then, one day, he'll have filed the key to match all of the pins, and the door will open.

This attack has the advantage that it doesn't look like an attack. It just looks like a lost tenant who briefly visits the wrong door, and then leaves once he's realized his mistake. And when he's done, he'll have a working key.

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