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RSA (and other public key cryptosystems) is extremely computationally expensive, making it impractical to use it to encrypt an entire transaction. So public-key encryption is generally used only to agree on a symmetric encryption key, which is then used to encrypt the rest of the transaction using a symmetric algorithm such as AES or 3DES.

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RSA (and other public key cryptosystems) is extremely computationally expensive, making it impractical to use it to encrypt an entire transaction. So public-key encryption is generally used only to agree on a symmetric encryption key, which is then used to encrypt the rest of the transaction using a symmetric algorithm such as AES or 3DES.

See the accepted answer to this question for more details.

RSA (and other public key cryptosystems) is extremely computationally expensive, making it impractical to use it to encrypt an entire transaction. So public-key encryption is generally used only to agree on a symmetric encryption key, which is then used to encrypt the rest of the transaction using a symmetric algorithm such as AES or 3DES.

See the accepted answer to this question for more details.

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RSA (and other public key cryptosystems) is extremely computationally expensive, making it impractical to use it to encrypt an entire transaction. So public-key encryption is generally used only to agree on a symmetric encryption key, which is then used to encrypt the rest of the transaction using a symmetric algorithm such as AES or 3DES.

See the accepted answer to this question for more details.