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Passwords with a mixedmixture of letters, numbers, and special characters are sometimes hard to remember. Is it alternatively secure to instead use a small amount of memorable source code as a 'passphrase'?

As an example, take a simple for loop in Go: fori:=1;i<5;i++{fmt.Println(i)}

Normal people would only see the cryptic syntax, but as a person with a programmigprogramming background is, this may be more or less easy to read or memorize. Would it be at least as secure as a normal password?

Passwords with a mixed letters, numbers and special characters are sometimes hard to remember. Is it alternatively secure to use a small amount of memorable source code as a 'passphrase'?

As example a simple for loop in Go: fori:=1;i<5;i++{fmt.Println(i)}

Normal people would only see the cryptic syntax but as a person with a programmig background is this more or less easy to read or memorize.

Passwords with a mixture of letters, numbers, and special characters are sometimes hard to remember. Is it secure to instead use a small amount of memorable source code as a 'passphrase'?

As an example, take a simple for loop in Go: fori:=1;i<5;i++{fmt.Println(i)}

Normal people would only see the cryptic syntax, but as a person with a programming background, this may be more easy to memorize. Would it be at least as secure as a normal password?

2 deleted 1 character in body
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Passwords with a mixed letters, numbers and special characters are sometimes hard to remember. Is it alternatively secure to use a small amount of memorable source code as a 'passphrase'?

As example a simple for loop in Go: for ifori:=1;i<5;i++{fmt.Println(i)}

Normal people would only see the cryptic syntax but as a person with a programmig background is this more or less easy to read or memorize.

Passwords with a mixed letters, numbers and special characters are sometimes hard to remember. Is it alternatively secure to use a small amount of memorable source code as a 'passphrase'?

As example a simple for loop in Go: for i:=1;i<5;i++{fmt.Println(i)}

Normal people would only see the cryptic syntax but as a person with a programmig background is this more or less easy to read or memorize.

Passwords with a mixed letters, numbers and special characters are sometimes hard to remember. Is it alternatively secure to use a small amount of memorable source code as a 'passphrase'?

As example a simple for loop in Go: fori:=1;i<5;i++{fmt.Println(i)}

Normal people would only see the cryptic syntax but as a person with a programmig background is this more or less easy to read or memorize.

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Source code as password

Passwords with a mixed letters, numbers and special characters are sometimes hard to remember. Is it alternatively secure to use a small amount of memorable source code as a 'passphrase'?

As example a simple for loop in Go: for i:=1;i<5;i++{fmt.Println(i)}

Normal people would only see the cryptic syntax but as a person with a programmig background is this more or less easy to read or memorize.