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You didn't specify your thread model very clearly, but it seems you're concerned with a state-sponsored actor that is interested in accessing your email in particular. The setup you've described will not prevent that (provided there's interest). As an example, there's strong evidence that the Heartbleed bug has been extensively used before its public discovery. If you were a sufficiently interesting target running a email server, compromising it would have been no problem at all. A sufficiently well-funded adversary will have the capability of compromising any practical security system you can devise.

You didn't specify your thread model very clearly, but it seems you're concerned with a state-sponsored actor that is interested in accessing your email in particular. The setup you've described will not prevent that (provided there's interest). As an example, there's strong evidence that the Heartbleed bug has been extensively used before its public discovery. A sufficiently well-funded adversary will have the capability of compromising any practical security system you can devise.

You didn't specify your thread model very clearly, but it seems you're concerned with a state-sponsored actor that is interested in accessing your email in particular. The setup you've described will not prevent that. As an example, there's strong evidence that the Heartbleed bug has been extensively used before its public discovery. If you were a sufficiently interesting target running a email server, compromising it would have been no problem at all. A sufficiently well-funded adversary will have the capability of compromising any practical security system you can devise.

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To give you a quick idea, a popular book that covers one of the most popular MTAs spans around 500 pagesa popular book that covers one of the most popular MTAs spans around 500 pages.

That's just for the MTA. In the real world you'll also need an LDAMDA with POP/IMAP, spam filtering and probably a authentication server.

You're also neglecting the continued effort needed to keep the system healthy and securecontinued effort needed to keep the system healthy and secure:

Unless you're happy losing emailhaving your messages severely delayed occasionally (or lost, in the worst case), there's a lot of other things that are also needed to reliably provide email (backup MX, failover and storage redundancy come to mind). A single home server probably won't be enough if your connection drops and you need to respond to a email urgently.

You didn't specify your thread model very clearly, but it seems you're concerned with a state-sponsored actor that is interested in accessing your email in particular. The setup you've described will not prevent that (provided there's interest). As an example, there's strong evidence that the Heartbleed bug has been extensively used before its public discovery. A sufficiently well-funded adversary will have the capability of compromising any practical security system you can devise.A sufficiently well-funded adversary will have the capability of compromising any practical security system you can devise.

Self-hosting also has the severe disadvantage of exposing much more information about youSelf-hosting also has the severe disadvantage of exposing much more information about you, if your system has few users. Your ISP can trivially tell when you receive or send an email, and with which providers you communicate.

PGP in particular is unrivaled against this particular threat modelPGP is unrivaled against this particular threat model, as you don't need to trust any server or provider at all.

Compared to maintaining a email server, PGP is actually quite easy to use and understand.

To give you a quick idea, a popular book that covers one of the most popular MTAs spans around 500 pages.

That's just for the MTA. In the real world you'll also need an LDA with POP/IMAP, spam filtering and probably a authentication server.

You're also neglecting the continued effort needed to keep the system healthy and secure:

Unless you're happy losing email occasionally, there's a lot of other things that are also needed to reliably provide email (backup MX, failover and storage redundancy come to mind). A single home server probably won't be enough if your connection drops and you need to respond to a email urgently.

You didn't specify your thread model very clearly, but it seems you're concerned with a state-sponsored actor that is interested in accessing your email in particular. The setup you've described will not prevent that. As an example, there's strong evidence that the Heartbleed bug has been extensively used before its public discovery. A sufficiently well-funded adversary will have the capability of compromising any practical security system you can devise.

Self-hosting also has the severe disadvantage of exposing much more information about you, if your system has few users. Your ISP can trivially tell when you receive or send an email, and with which providers you communicate.

PGP in particular is unrivaled against this particular threat model, as you don't need to trust any server at all.

To give you a quick idea, a popular book that covers one of the most popular MTAs spans around 500 pages.

That's just for the MTA. In the real world you'll also need an MDA with POP/IMAP, spam filtering and probably a authentication server.

You're also neglecting the continued effort needed to keep the system healthy and secure:

Unless you're happy having your messages severely delayed occasionally (or lost, in the worst case), there's a lot of other things that are also needed to reliably provide email (backup MX, failover and storage redundancy come to mind). A single home server probably won't be enough if your connection drops and you need to respond to a email urgently.

You didn't specify your thread model very clearly, but it seems you're concerned with a state-sponsored actor that is interested in accessing your email in particular. The setup you've described will not prevent that (provided there's interest). As an example, there's strong evidence that the Heartbleed bug has been extensively used before its public discovery. A sufficiently well-funded adversary will have the capability of compromising any practical security system you can devise.

Self-hosting also has the severe disadvantage of exposing much more information about you, if your system has few users. Your ISP can trivially tell when you receive or send an email, and with which providers you communicate.

PGP is unrivaled against this particular threat model, as you don't need to trust any server or provider at all.

Compared to maintaining a email server, PGP is actually quite easy to use and understand.

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