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Suppose a malicious web page pops up a fake system notification and vibrates at the same time. How confident would you be of telling the difference between a legitimate pop-up and a .png on the web page you're viewing.

(Source)

Personally I have not heard of any exploit related to HTML5 Vibrate API, but it could be used for evil goals as shown on the link above. But more seriouslyserious is what the quoted text above mentions: you can not distinguish between a legitimate pop-up and something else. This something else could be a pop-up used to trigger a drive-by download attack leading to malware (usually spyware or adware) installation on your system by exploiting the vulnerabilities of the browser you use (or those of its plugins).

But luckily, I was able to calm my nerves sufficiently to realize that this is a scare-ware served through an ad-server and that the anti-virus could be the actual virus.

You have rather been wise in your decision because it could be a drive-by download attack. Try to use free (but powerful) services such as Stop Badware on your laptop to see if the website you surfed is blacklisted (notification may be negative in case the website is compromised too recently and no one reported it).

Suppose a malicious web page pops up a fake system notification and vibrates at the same time. How confident would you be of telling the difference between a legitimate pop-up and a .png on the web page you're viewing.

(Source)

Personally I have not heard of any exploit related to HTML5 Vibrate API, but it could be used for evil goals as shown on the link above. But more seriously is what the quoted text above mentions: you can not distinguish between a legitimate pop-up and something else. This something else could be a pop-up used to trigger a drive-by download attack leading to malware (usually spyware or adware) on your system by exploiting the vulnerabilities of the browser you use (or those of its plugins).

But luckily, I was able to calm my nerves sufficiently to realize that this is a scare-ware served through an ad-server and that the anti-virus could be the actual virus.

You have rather been wise in your decision because it could be a drive-by download attack. Try to use free (but powerful) services such as Stop Badware on your laptop to see if the website you surfed is blacklisted (notification may be negative in case the website is compromised too recently and no one reported it).

Suppose a malicious web page pops up a fake system notification and vibrates at the same time. How confident would you be of telling the difference between a legitimate pop-up and a .png on the web page you're viewing.

(Source)

Personally I have not heard of any exploit related to HTML5 Vibrate API, but it could be used for evil goals as shown on the link above. But more serious is what the quoted text above mentions: you can not distinguish between a legitimate pop-up and something else. This something else could be a pop-up used to trigger a drive-by download attack leading to malware (usually spyware or adware) installation on your system by exploiting the vulnerabilities of the browser you use (or those of its plugins).

But luckily, I was able to calm my nerves sufficiently to realize that this is a scare-ware served through an ad-server and that the anti-virus could be the actual virus.

You have rather been wise in your decision because it could be a drive-by download attack. Try to use free (but powerful) services such as Stop Badware on your laptop to see if the website you surfed is blacklisted (notification may be negative in case the website is compromised too recently and no one reported it).

2 added 276 characters in body
source | link

Suppose a malicious web page pops up a fake system notification and vibrates at the same time. How confident would you be of telling the difference between a legitimate pop-up and a .png on the web page you're viewing.

(Source)

Personally I have not heard of any exploit related to HTML5 Vibrate API, but it could be used for evil goals as shown on the link above. But more seriously is what the quoted text above mentions: you can not distinguish between a legitimate pop-up and something else. This something else could be a pop-up used to trigger a drive-by download attack leading to malware (usually spyware or adware) on your system by exploiting the vulnerabilities of the browser you use (or those of its plugins).

But luckily, I was able to calm my nerves sufficiently to realize that this is a scare-ware served through an ad-server and that the anti-virus could be the actual virus.

You have rather been wise in your decision because it could be a drive-by download attack. Try to use free (but powerful) services such as Stop Badware on your laptop to see if the website you surfed is blacklisted (notification may be negative in case the website is compromised too recently and no one reported it).

Suppose a malicious web page pops up a fake system notification and vibrates at the same time. How confident would you be of telling the difference between a legitimate pop-up and a .png on the web page you're viewing.

(Source)

Personally I have not heard of any exploit related to HTML5 Vibrate API, but it could be used for evil goals as shown on the link above. But more seriously is what the quoted text above mentions: you can not distinguish between a legitimate pop-up and something else. This something else could be a pop-up used to trigger a drive-by download attack leading to malware (usually spyware or adware) on your system by exploiting the vulnerabilities of the browser you use (or those of its plugins).

Suppose a malicious web page pops up a fake system notification and vibrates at the same time. How confident would you be of telling the difference between a legitimate pop-up and a .png on the web page you're viewing.

(Source)

Personally I have not heard of any exploit related to HTML5 Vibrate API, but it could be used for evil goals as shown on the link above. But more seriously is what the quoted text above mentions: you can not distinguish between a legitimate pop-up and something else. This something else could be a pop-up used to trigger a drive-by download attack leading to malware (usually spyware or adware) on your system by exploiting the vulnerabilities of the browser you use (or those of its plugins).

But luckily, I was able to calm my nerves sufficiently to realize that this is a scare-ware served through an ad-server and that the anti-virus could be the actual virus.

You have rather been wise in your decision because it could be a drive-by download attack. Try to use free (but powerful) services such as Stop Badware on your laptop to see if the website you surfed is blacklisted (notification may be negative in case the website is compromised too recently and no one reported it).

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source | link

Suppose a malicious web page pops up a fake system notification and vibrates at the same time. How confident would you be of telling the difference between a legitimate pop-up and a .png on the web page you're viewing.

(Source)

Personally I have not heard of any exploit related to HTML5 Vibrate API, but it could be used for evil goals as shown on the link above. But more seriously is what the quoted text above mentions: you can not distinguish between a legitimate pop-up and something else. This something else could be a pop-up used to trigger a drive-by download attack leading to malware (usually spyware or adware) on your system by exploiting the vulnerabilities of the browser you use (or those of its plugins).