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So lets say you can edit/insert one random key inside regedit (can be in any position in the entire tree structure HKLM/HKCU) in order get admin privileges. Any ideas?

closed as off-topic by RoraΖ, user45139, Deer Hunter, Neil Smithline, Iszi Oct 29 '15 at 21:37

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question does not appear to be about Information security within the scope defined in the help center." – RoraΖ, Community, Deer Hunter, Neil Smithline
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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In HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Windows\currentversion\run or runonce, I would try to insert a new string with this command: cmd.exe /c net localgroup Administrators <my windows account> /add

With that, at the next startup of the computer, your account will be in the admin group.

Or I would try to modify the proxy paramaters of Ie in \CurrentVersion\Internet Settings to be able to capture http traffic.

However, for writing in those keys, you must be logged as admin...

  • "However, for writing in those keys, you must be logged as admin..." Or you find a way around it. ;) – Mark Buffalo Oct 29 '15 at 13:03
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    @MarkHulkalo : Yes of course, I didn't mention that in my answer, but if you can write in the run key, I would try to copy a script or a executable and execute it by this way. – Sorcha Oct 29 '15 at 13:09
  • Now I am doubty, but HKCU is writable from the current user, which does not have to be admin, indeed I am trying it being normal user and I can. In that case I think that command will be execute with my user priviledges once I log in corrently. Maybe you refer to HKLM? I would like to find some answer which does not imply to reboot (if possible of course). Thank guys – Tzaoh Oct 29 '15 at 14:37
  • You are right, I wrote my answer too fast. I edited my answer. – Sorcha Oct 29 '15 at 14:44
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So lets say you can edit/insert one random key inside regedit (can be in any position in the entire tree structure HKLM/HKCU) in order get admin privileges. Any ideas?

You don't bother because you already have Admin privileges.

  • I do not get why I have to convince you about this, I explained a possible scenario and instead of thinking that it could be possible you just say I am already Admin. One of the most common mistakes is to assume facts that noone established. I would like more ideas, maybe you have anything more in mind. Why was this question mark as off-topic? I think is a clear question about privilege escalation and security. Maybe people were too restrictive? am I being naive with anything? Thanks – Tzaoh Oct 30 '15 at 9:31
  • @Tzaoh It is assumed you already have Admin privileges because, in your scenario, you state we have the ability to write to anywhere within HKCU/HKLM. HKCU is, for the most part, writable by any user - the "CU" standing for "Current User", so of course they should be allowed to write to it. But HKLM ("LM" standing for "Local Machine") can effect global changes upon the system, so only Administrators should be able to arbitrarily write to it. It's generally unlikely (if not impossible) that you'll find yourself in a situation that you'll have such permissions and not have full Admin access. – Iszi Oct 30 '15 at 14:27
  • @Tzaoh As for why it was closed, the majority of people (those who are listed under the close reason) selected "not about Information Security". However, my selection (not shown in the closure notice because it was a minority) used: "Questions asking us to break the security of a specific system for you are off-topic unless they demonstrate an understanding of the concepts involved and clearly identify a specific problem.". – Iszi Oct 30 '15 at 14:29
  • "It's generally unlikely (if not impossible) that you'll find yourself in a situation that you'll have such permissions and not have full Admin access". Well, that is the situation I described. Of couse is not a Windows bug but Administrator mistake. He provide a mechanism to install third party programs which involves insertion of some reg files that can be manipulated before the instalation begins. There you have your strange condition. I just wanted to read original ideas, nothing more nothing less. – Tzaoh Oct 30 '15 at 16:14
  • About why this was close, I am not refering especifically for your downvote but in a general way. It is just I did not know where to discuss about the unfair close (imho). – Tzaoh Oct 30 '15 at 16:14

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