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I just accepted a position at a small firm and was testing the previous WiFi setup for flaws and exploits that were possible. We have two AP's for business and guest connections, everything checks out on the guest (Free WiFi). But I just found a note (probably left by my previous positions tech), that has the business AP's MAC address, IP, and Port in plain sight in the lobby.

So my question is what attacks or exploits could have been possible during this time?

Business AP uses Mac address filtering, and I'm aware of MAC spoofing as a probability. Any others?

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  • Does it also have the wi-fi password? – Matthew Nov 17 '15 at 15:40
  • It has what I believe could've been a password (if you consider "12345!!!" A password). We overhauled most of the previous setup, so I am unable to verify if this was actually being used. – Jeff Morrison Nov 17 '15 at 21:14
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    In that case, assume that someone could have connected to it and wandered around the network. If you can do it from a connected computer without passwords, they could do just the same. Additionally, they might have knowledge of other vulnerabilities against your systems. – Matthew Nov 17 '15 at 21:17
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If the WiFi network is configured securely (which is a topic for another question), none of that information should be required to keep secret.

The MAC address of a WiFi access point is no secret: It is constantly broadcasting it anyway.

With "IP and port" you surely mean the IP and port of the web interface. When that interface has a password which is long enough to withstand a brute-force attack (having a username which is not "admin" or something equally obvious is a bonus), this should not be a problem. This is also no secret information: Most consumer-grade models have these hardcoded and with better wifi access points where it can be changed, it is often left on the default. So there aren't many guesses to make.

  • Though with what I am to assume is a hidden network with no security on it, there is everything wrong with this wifi, MAC address filtering is not security lol – TheHidden Nov 17 '15 at 15:50
  • It was setup for WPA2 W/ WPS, I'm aware of wps being vulnerable. I agree with you about MAC address filtering being almost useless (like having a lock on a screen door). Edit: the "Business" WiFi Wasn't hidden. – Jeff Morrison Nov 17 '15 at 21:20

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