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How can you locate the source of spoof calls and texts. I'm having threatening messages and deliveries made from my phone number, but not from my phone to my home and other peoples phones and they're thinking it's me

marked as duplicate by Neil Smithline, Xander, schroeder Nov 30 '15 at 21:35

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    Best bet would be to contact your phone provider and see if they can do anything. If you are receiving threatening messages it would also be worth speaking to the police. – Matthew Nov 30 '15 at 9:57
  • If you contact authorities really put it on them or your case will not really go anywhere. – Tim Jonas Nov 30 '15 at 11:50
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    I'm having threatening messages and deliveries made from my phone number - how do you know? If people have told you, then advise everybody you know (maybe via social media) that your number has changed due to somebody sending malicious messages on your behalf, then get a new number. It's easier, less hassle, and it also covers you for anything in the future that may have otherwise caused you trouble. Unfortunately, it's very easy to send messages from somebody else's number - probably not much you can do about this. – user81147 Nov 30 '15 at 13:46
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You personally don't investigate it as you don't have the access to do it. You need to get your telephone company involved, because there's no way for you to determine this on your own. If this is a mobile phone then it's likely someone has cloned your sim card, and you will need to get a new one from your provider to get it to stop. If it's your land line it's more complex to solve, in many places you can spoof a phone number using specialized equipment which is not that expensive anymore, but again it's your phone company who would investigate the source. If the source is outside their network it could be hard to trace.

Another path to a solution would be to determine who would want to do this. What's their goal? If you can figure that out then you probably know who is doing it, if you have a theory then take it to law enforcement as that's their job.

  • Cloning a sim card isn't necessary. It's very easy to send texts from a number that is not yours. – user81147 Nov 30 '15 at 13:43
  • Also, What's their goal? If you can figure that out... - you just advised them not to investigate it!? – user81147 Nov 30 '15 at 13:44
  • That's a good point @JayMee, I've edited to make the points clearer. – GdD Nov 30 '15 at 14:04

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