2

I came across two papers written on this topic:

Buses for Anonymous Message Delivery

and

Tokens for anonymous Communications in the Internet

I am probably missing a lot of the nuance, and I could try to summarize here how I understand it, but it'd probably be wrong.

1) Are these systems feasible? Feasible in the sense that I could access or send information to a web application and not require more than a few seconds in latency.

2) Would these concepts work with existing infrastructure? Or does it require being entirely removed from the way internet traffic is handled now?

3) Do these systems have any sort of extra costs to them? Does it create a tremendous waste of bandwidth or processing power?

4) Are there any more resources on this topic I could look at?

5) Is moving away from HTTP a pipe dream? Does anyone have any real motivation to do so in order to have more privacy/anonymity online? Is there a better method for privacy online that doesn't rely on using proxies or concepts like Onion routing?

6) My impression is that these anonymous message delivery concepts are theoretically a more secure (in terms of hiding identity) concept than Onion routing. Onion routing seems like it would have tremendously more ways to be thwarted than something inherently anonymous. Is this wrong? Is Onion routing anonymity superior in some way?

closed as too broad by Philipp, Stephane, WhiteWinterWolf, Bob Brown, Xander Dec 28 '15 at 13:39

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • You are not asking one question, you are asking six. Also, the two papers you linked seem to talk about different techniques, so we are at twelve questions. I voted to close this as too broad. – Philipp Dec 28 '15 at 6:25
  • @Philipp do you recommend I post twelve individual questions, one right after the other? Where else would you recommend I take this discussion? The tone of your post isn't very helpful. – Vayeate Dec 28 '15 at 6:32
  • 1
    I would recommend two questions, one for each paper. I would also only recommend to ask questions 1-3 for each. 4 is off-topic and opinion-based, 5 is nonsense (HTTP is an application level protocol, these papers describe transport-layer protocols) and 6 would require a discussion of all the pros and cons of onion routing which would go too far. – Philipp Dec 28 '15 at 6:37
  • I am not sure how asking for more resources on a topic is off-top and opinion based, it seems the opposite on both counts. The basic premise behind each paper seemed fairly similar to me, but I have no expertise in this area, so I could be completely wrong. I appreciate your feedback, but I might suggest in the future you take the time to pre-emptively make these distinctions because otherwise you come across as dismissive and unhelpful. To your credit, I think I may misunderstand the nature of stackexchange questions, I will RTFM more carefully before posting again. – Vayeate Dec 28 '15 at 6:42
  • en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anonymous_remailer is a start – Neil McGuigan Dec 28 '15 at 8:43