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I know that the 1-wire protocol has a slower communication and that it can be physically accessible and there other ways to get the information from the data bus.

I can't seem to find much information about security in this protocol, for what I have seen, I consider it insecure, I don't see any form of security applied to it.

Do you consider this protocol insecure as well? or I'm missing something?

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    I feel that your question is too broad to be answerable. You are asking for a security analysis of an entire protocol / solution, any qualified consultant would charge an arm and a leg for that kind of work! If you edit your question to include the research you've done and any specific concerns you have then your question would be easier to answer. – Mike Ounsworth Mar 29 '16 at 13:52
  • It doesn't have any inherent security at all. You can route challenge-response over it, e.g. DS1961S devices. – pjc50 Mar 29 '16 at 15:27
  • @MikeOunsworth I just edited the question, I hope I'm more clear this time, it is still too broad? – Luz A Mar 29 '16 at 22:17
  • Yup, better :-) I voted to re-open. – Mike Ounsworth Mar 29 '16 at 22:20
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The 1-wire protocol does not have any built-in security at all. But it shouldn't have any either, since the 1-wire protocol is on the layer 2 of the OSI model.

However, depending on the devices you hook up on 1-wire, there is possibility to add security. There are 1-wire chips that can do encryption and/or authentication without problems, for example as pointed out in comments about the DS1961S chip. And this is something that is then done on the application layer (layer 7) of the 1-wire network.

A 1-wire network can be compared with the "ethernet protocol" or "RS232 protocol", or even "433,92 Mhz wireless", or IR communication between a TV remote and TV set. Its just a transmission medium for sending payloads. The payload can of course contain more advanced packets, for example IPv4/IPv6 packets if you want. One example of routing IPv4/IPv6 packets over RS232 is PPP protocol (Point to Point Protocol), where PPP protocol is a protcol that contains built-in security (but nowadays very bad security).

So in short: 1-wire is as secure as you make it.

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