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I work for a company who's checks have been fraudulently copied and used in a scam. I'd like to report this to my local PD, but I'm concerned they'll get the FBI involved. As I understand it, once the FBI gets involved, their investigation becomes very invasive and would put a tremendous strain on our organization. I just want to file a police report and that's it. How do I do that? Thoughts?

closed as off-topic by Bryan Field, Anders, Steffen Ullrich, drewbenn, Xander Oct 4 '16 at 17:39

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question does not appear to be about Information security within the scope defined in the help center." – Bryan Field, Anders, Steffen Ullrich, drewbenn, Xander
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    The government does what the hell it wants. If you file a report, if they're interested they will get involved. That said, check fraud is serious. If it's part of a bigger scam you will want to report it and hope they get involved. – Anthony Russell Oct 4 '16 at 15:33
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    This question is not about IT Security. – Bryan Field Oct 4 '16 at 15:53
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    If you're that concerned about what might be discovered during the course of a federal investigation then you need to consult an attorney, not SO. – Ivan Oct 4 '16 at 16:30
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    Not only is it not about IT security, it is also primarily opinion-based, so it would probably not fit in Law.SE . That being said, I second @Johnny's advice: consult an attorney. – A. Darwin Oct 4 '16 at 16:37
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Hire an attorney. It sounds like you want to help the police catch the person but limit the scope and impact of an investigation. Attorneys can help you with this.

Likewise an attorney can advise you about what is most likely to happen. You may find out that you actually have nothing to worry about and that this might be easier than you think. In any case, it's not uncommon for attorneys to have an initial discussion for free so you have very little risk in that initial discussion and are very likely to learn about how this is handled in your jurisdiction.

Long-term: Learn how to make it cheaper and easier for your company to deal with discovery requests. Odds are as your business continues to operate you are at increasing odds of eventually running into a need to handle a discovery request. If you plan for it this can be a trivial process with low impact to your team. Not planning for it is what makes it painful.

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