-1

ProtonMail is said to be privacy friendly email service but some technical issues seem blurry to me. First, it requires JS. Second, its mobile app has to be downloaded from Google Play Store or iOS store. Privacy concerned users might want to ditch Google and similar services entirely.

Third, normally users can do a reCAPTCHA and sign up. But when users try to sign up via Tor network, ProtonMail forces to verify phone number or email address. How does it know whether I am using Tor or not? I suspect IP logging?

  • The whole thing sounds sketchy and I wouldn't trust it for the reasons you mention, but they don't necessarily need to be logging (committing to disk) your IP address in order to look it up on the public Tor IP lists. – Ivan Nov 14 '16 at 21:37
  • 1
    I'm not really sure what you are asking. Of course they will be logging IP - they are a web service and traffic logs are kind of important. Nothing sketchy has to be going on for them to know that you are using TOR. Can you expand on what your question is? – schroeder Nov 14 '16 at 21:48
1

Proton mail does not log IP address by default. but this can be changed in

settings -> security for authentication purposes when you log into webmail.

They don't need to know IP in order to learn if a user is using tor, there are other techniques to verify this, such as browser fingerprinting. even if logging of an IP address is turned off a server still knows the IP otherwise connection would not be possible. this has nothing to do with logging.

The reason why google app is on google play is reasonable and that is to increase popularity and availability of a product, and google is a perfect place for this.

Edit: There is no such thing as "Trusted email" currently on the internet. Protonmail, tutanota and few other open source emails are among the best choices now. Proton mail being better choice because switzerland does not need to hand over data to other parties, unlike other EU countries.

You should consider running your own email server in order to have complete control of privacy.

| improve this answer | |

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.