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I'm a little apprehensive that there is some unauthorized usage of my router or computer or phone. I have an Asus RT-AC66U, a macbook pro and an iPhone. I'm hoping someone here might be able to help.

I got a phone call from a "no caller id" a couple of weeks ago from some clearly scammers trying to get me to go to fastsupport.com and do something or other, I didn't, but I stayed on the phone with them for 10 minutes leading them on. A week or so later I got an email from Apple saying I needed to change my Apple ID password and security questions so I did, and then I needed to select my device from a list, and there was a device listed called "Neftali Lira's iPhone", definitely not mine but I thought it might have created a randomly generated option to ensure I picked the right device. Another week later I got overage notices from my ISP because I had used about 100gb more than normal this month. Sensing something was afoul I logged into iCloud and realized Neftali Lira's phone was still listed under my devices on find my iphone. I removed the device from my account, reset my phone to factory and restored my computer to a time machine backup from 3 months ago. Changed all my passwords, reset the router, changed its password. The next morning I got a phone call from a "no caller id", no one on the other end, so I hung up. I logged into my router to monitor traffic and noticed that 4.5gb had been downloaded and uploaded when I was not using the internet and the activity stopped the exact minute I got the phone call. Either very coincidental or very suspicious.

I did some research at this point, fastsupport.com is clearly a phishing scam, but I never downloaded anything from their website, only talked to them on the phone, I might have visited the website on my phone out of curiosity, I remember what it looks like but I can't remember from which device I looked at it, can they get into my devices from just a phone call or me visiting the site? My router, RT-AC66U has some old firmware that I was using and from what I've read I think was vulnerable, I was running: 3.0.0.4.374., I've just now updated to 3.0.0.4.380 and changed the passwords again. I don't know anything about this type of security stuff, does any of that seem suspect to anyone? Is it possible they got access to my data? Am I safe now? Thanks in advance for any help.

  • There are possibly multiple, unrelated breaches occurring here (that appear to be correlated). It's hard to tell what's relevant/what's happening because you're mixing your opinion of what happened into the facts you're presenting. – tangrs Jan 8 '17 at 4:52
  • To be honest, there's nothing in your story that I would consider extremely suspicious. A few curious points perhaps but nothing to suspect anything malicious is occurring (at least with the facts you've presented thus far). – tangrs Jan 8 '17 at 4:59
  • Notices from Apple to update security questions is normal (I presume you've checked for phishing). Sometimes people forget to remove old devices from their iCloud accounts so you still see the devices on there (or you signed into iCloud on another device and forgot to sign out). The 100GB excess usage could have come from anywhere and does not, by itself, mean there is anything malicious occurring (same with the 4.5GB). Finally, I can see no way how the calls would be correlated to anything you've described. – tangrs Jan 8 '17 at 5:05
  • As you have an old router, it is possible that someone in your neighbor has cracked your WPS pin. – defalt Jan 8 '17 at 5:44
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    @AlanWatch I have no neighbors, live in the middle of nowhere – Evan Jan 8 '17 at 5:56
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Was the e-mail really from Apple or was it a phishing scam? Fake 'change your password' e-mails that send you to fake websites rather than to the company's actual website to get you to enter your information aren't rare.

I really doubt the phone calls are related, everybody I know gets periodic fake calls like that. Talking with them lets them know that they have a chance to get information out of you and usually increases the frequency of the calls.

I suspect a neighbor is using your WiFi. It's not very hard to hack WiFi passwords, especially if you're using an older security protocol. I would try turning on a MAC address filter on your router so only your devices can connect to it. MAC addresses can be faked too, but it'd be another hoop for people to jump through to use your WiFi.

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I'd say that you are definitely hacked, but who knows where.

since you have apple stuff. try to contact them and ask if they would be willing to reinstall your software for you in your phone and laptop. ask your phone services provider politely (you pay them money, you are a client i assume) if they could help you to track that anonymous caller or block phone calls from withheld numbers.

when you change your passwords do it from a machine that is not compromised, so different laptop running live linux(my fav), using a secure access point(do not use internet caffe or free wifi for eg). not your router, ask a friend or family member and use their router, i believe you can trust your isp.

when using different router use an ethernet cable not wifi. give it a go.

  • Please keep it classy – schroeder Jan 10 '17 at 7:31
  • hakz, there was not not even a single swear word – YouShallPass_Promtply Jan 10 '17 at 20:40
  • review your example 'password' again ... – schroeder Jan 10 '17 at 21:17

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