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I am using a client computer that is connected to a modem via a LAN cable which is in a neighboring house as far as about 50 meters. The host computer is there. The host computer is only using Internet Connection Sharing (without a router) to share its Internet connection with me. Within this network there are only two computers, the one I use (as client) in my house and the other one is the host computer as I mentioned earlier.

How do I know that the host computer is being turned on or off?

The purpose is to know so that I can use all the bandwidth from the modem when the host computer is not turn on. Because there are no restrictions on bandwidth from the host computer, and I just wanted to use all the available bandwidth only when the host computer is not turned on.

Both computers use Windows 7.

closed as off-topic by Anders, ThoriumBR, wireghoul, Xiong Chiamiov, Matthew Jan 25 '17 at 8:58

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question does not appear to be about Information security within the scope defined in the help center." – Anders, ThoriumBR, wireghoul, Xiong Chiamiov, Matthew
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    This is more of a basic networking question than a security question. Using ping in the command prompt will tell you if it is on/connected. Use ipconfig on the other pc to find out what IP address to ping. – J.A.K. Jan 24 '17 at 18:41
  • The host computer is only using Internet Connection Sharing You mean it's being used as a bridge or do you connect (Your long LAN cable) directly to the router? – Azteca Jan 24 '17 at 18:51
  • To J.A.K: Pinging 192.168.1.1 with 32 bytes of data: Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=64 Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=64 Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=64 Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=64 Ping statistics for 192.168.1.1: Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss), Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds: Minimum = 0ms, Maximum = 0ms, Average = 0ms – Stiev Jan 24 '17 at 19:02
  • To Azteca: We are not using a router, the LAN cable is directly connected to one port of the modem. I do not know if it a bridge or not, because i don't know about something called bridge :) – Stiev Jan 24 '17 at 19:07
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    @Azteca Ok thank you for your advice... this is my first run on stackexchange :) – Stiev Jan 24 '17 at 21:19
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If you're connected directly to the Modem (Given that is provided by the ISP) in most countries it works as a router (Layer 3, 2 and 1 device) meaning that it redirects traffic and it's the gateway of your LAN to the WAN.

If you got a 192.168.1.1 IP this means the modem is NATing, so it's most likely you're both on the same network. Assuming that the firewall is on default settings, the host computer should be able to reply ICMP (ping / echo request), so just figure out his IP, either by actually asking your neighbor and pinging it, or doing a ping sweep with tools like Nmap or Angry Ip Scanner and if it times-out, it's off, if it replies, it's on.

READ THIS: PING SWEEP DISCLAIMER

  • Just realized that this has nothing to do with security, should've been moved to superUser or serverfault stackExchange. – Azteca Jan 24 '17 at 22:38

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