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I read in Wikipedia that there were two ways to achieve "memory protection"

  1. Access control lists
  2. "Traits" where a SUN processor used traits for pointer and the memory. That particular processor had hardware designed to control a program by using "traits" for the pointers and the memory. I'm looking for the technique of that SUN CPU. There's nothing about it reading the Wikipedia article about memory protection. I'm certain there was a Wikipedia article that mentioned it.

I don't find the article again. Is it possible that you can help me find the article or more information about the above techniques?

  • Both terms are googleable. – Marcus Müller Feb 19 '17 at 15:31
  • @MarcusMüller I'm looking for the technique of that SUN CPU. There's nothing about it reading the Wikipedia article about memory protection. I'm certain there was a Wikipedia article that mentioned it. – Niklas Rosencrantz Feb 19 '17 at 15:55
  • hm, what SUN CPU are we talking about, potentially? Assuming "Sun" is the company (the ones later bought by Oracle), they, as far as I remember, only ever produced the UltraSPARC series of CPUs – Marcus Müller Feb 19 '17 at 16:45
  • @MarcusMüller Yes, that's what the lost info was about. First about access control lists and then it mentioned hardware technique similar to what I read about in google about marking traits: Addresses passed in buffers between processes are marked insecure, and control instructions using those addresses as targets will raise an exception – Niklas Rosencrantz Feb 19 '17 at 16:59

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