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This evening I received an email from Microsoft saying my account had been compromised.

I changed the password and looked at the activity log. This is what I saw three days ago on the 16th of Feburary

Protocol: IMAP IP: 111.110.153.191 Account alias: email address Time:2/16/2017 8:37 AM Approximate location: Japan Type: Successful sync Blockquote

I've changed all passwords and created a new email address for some websites which used the compromised Hotmail address.

I'm pretty worried if I'm honest. This address was hooked up to Amazon, Steam, eBay (not PayPal) and pretty much everywhere. What kind of damage am I looking at?

I've contacted Microsoft who of course were no help what so ever.

closed as unclear what you're asking by PwdRsch, CaffeineAddiction, Matthew, Xander, Steve Feb 21 '17 at 20:25

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • I've contacted Microsoft who of course were no help what so ever. - I don't know what kind of help you expected from Microsoft. You should probably know better than Microsoft where you used this account and for what purpose. And if they notify you that the account is compromised you know that somebody else had access. In this case you have to expect that the associated accounts like Amazon, eBay ... might be compromised too since password resets and similar are often done to the associated email. – Steffen Ullrich Feb 20 '17 at 6:04
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I would look for unknown activity. I would cancel your Ebay and amazon account you can get quite a bit of information from that if its not to late.

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Assuming that the email stating your account was compromised really does come from Microsoft these are my suggestions:

  • Discard local malware, some malware is designed to steal your passwords and that may be one way an attacker got access to your email
  • Change your password and disconnect from services you need (Amazon and eBay for example)
  • Contact your humans about the situation, your email account may be used for phishing.
  • Use email aliases or multiple emails for different purposes, for example "internet_persona_1@some-email-provider" for baseball forums/groups, "internet_persona_2@some-email-provider", a different email with a different password. The idea is that for each activity you limit the information you provide to the website/people in that environment. If your baseball email gets compromised they shouldn't have immediate access to your bank email. This same principle is applied in the Qubes OS
  • Enable 2 factor authentication when possible (Google, Outlook).
  • Check your email's last activity logs to confirm wrongdoing (Google, Outlook)
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    Use email aliases or multiple emails for different purposes - I've actually never thought about this. Nice idea. – user81147 Feb 20 '17 at 9:47

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