2

I would like to create my own GSM network (base station with mobile devices connected to each other) and having voice/sms services. Something like demonstrated here: https://evilsocket.net/2016/03/31/how-to-build-your-own-rogue-gsm-bts-for-fun-and-profit/

I thought of creating my BTS station and device in lab without being connected to the outside world.

  1. But If I understand correctly, on creating such BTS it will "automatically" be connected to the outer world (so that device in my own lab will see other devices), Right ?

  2. Is it possible to create such network isolated from outer world ?

Thanks

closed as off-topic by Mike Ounsworth, Anders, schroeder Apr 18 '17 at 22:21

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question does not appear to be about Information security within the scope defined in the help center." – Mike Ounsworth, Anders, schroeder
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • I'm not seeing a security question here. It looks like a pure networking question. – schroeder Apr 18 '17 at 22:21
1

Depending on which country and jurisdiction you are in you will likely be violating wireless spectrum laws. By default, if you are playing with this via live antennas open to the world your answer to number 1 is it will undoubtedly interfere with commercial spectrum usage whether or not your network connects to other networks.

Answer 2: YES. Look into Faraday cage boxes or if your equipment is small enough even a Faraday Cage Bag will work. There are many commercial solutions to this and you can find ones being sold at lower costs used in many places.

Finally, do learn about how this is regulated in your jurisdiction before your begin. Some countries have very strict punishments for radio interference of critical infrastructure systems like telephony.

  • About (1), if it is the exact same bandwidth it should mean it is immediately connected to other networks (as a proxy) ? Thanks. – ransh Apr 12 '17 at 5:08
  • That depends on a lot of things but yes it could potentially be. – Trey Blalock Apr 12 '17 at 5:26
  • One last related question on this subject: when using "independent" BTS (let's say with the Faraday cage), connected with 2 mobile device , with sim cards. Should I expect them to successful connect (with eachother) voice/sms ,or do they need some other network for this to work ? Thx – ransh Apr 12 '17 at 6:37
  • Once you've got both devices on the same network via the BTS micro-cell you shouldn't have any problems getting SMS and calls to work. Some companies add 802.11 networking into their test environments to simulate applications that will use both 802.11 and the carrier network but you definitely don't have to do that. – Trey Blalock Apr 12 '17 at 6:59
  • The faraday solution is good one, yet it might make things more difficult in terms of using/pressing devices inside the faraday cage. Do you think that using low transmission power in the lab BTS can also be a good alternative (so that that the lab network won't interfere other network) ? – ransh Apr 13 '17 at 20:32

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