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I have set cameras for security at home, because someone broke into my house. As the suspect doesnt want to give up (got a mail from him, lol), I want to find more info about him. Because cameras are probably an obstacle, he would definitely want to disable them. So I thought about setting an false wifi with some name which would refer to access the camera web utility.

The question is: does such utility exist that would bring some info about the attacker? i.E. Device type would be a great info. And would you recommend to enable internet access on the honeypot router, if the attacker would (i hope so) be stupid to login?

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    Legal advice (last question) is off-topic here but I'm pretty sure that you cannot treat a Wifi where everybody can connect as legal evidence. If the attacker is stupid enough to connect is also less an information security problem. But, if the suspect is stupid you might already find interesting information by analyzing his mail. I recommend to strip all the off-topic things from your question so that it does not get closed for this reason. – Steffen Ullrich Jul 10 '17 at 17:31
  • cameras are not an obstacle, they are usually out of the way on a wall or ceiling... – dandavis Jul 10 '17 at 19:35
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Something that may interest you are "googledorks"; these are searches people execute to find various things on the web. Googling for "googledorks web camera" will give you many signatures that people search for when looking for web cameras on line. If you were to configure your honeypot to respond to those URLs, you might catch him trying to find your web cams.

To find suitable honeypot software, simply google for "honeypot web cam" and you should turn up several applications you could run. http://mushmush.org/ has a few specialized open source honeypots, including SNARE and TANNER. You set up SNARE by running a script that "clones" an existing site; all you should have to do is clone your webcam's access page. https://zeltser.com/honeypots-for-malware-ssh-web-attacks/ also has a list of honeypot software, but it's getting a little old.

Before you run off and invest in setting up a honeypot, consider what you will do with the information you learn. Vigilante justice is probably illegal where you live; and most local police won't be interested in a minor computer crime unless there's other evidence to go with it. And confronting the perpetrator yourself may put you at risk of violence. Please be careful with the information you obtain.

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