2

I made a call to co-worker this morning. While I was talking the call disconnected. When I looked at my phone it was making a call to another number, which I did not recognize. I let the call connect and a recording came on saying, in effect, that "it was not a working number". I called back my coworker and explained what happened. I researched my at&t online account and it shows the call as an incoming call from my coworker BUT he did not call me, I called him - both times. The phone number that kicked me off my original call shows up in my phone's call history list as an "outgoing" call but shows up in my online account calling history as an incoming call from my coworker. How does this work?

  • 4
    error in AT&T's network – schroeder Aug 21 '17 at 17:07
0

Yes, it might be possible in the India GSM Network, you may trace a call, send a SMS with others phone number, call someone using others phone number. But, for that IMSI number of victim is required, could be possible to get using Social Engineering Technique. Additionally, you should have a Raspberry-Pi with Dual-Antena, among which one is for signal receiving and another is for signal sending. This will create a local BTS (Base Transceiver Station) of your own in 50 meters range. In this range your may perform the above mentioned tasks.

  • Why did you guess he's in India when me mentions ATT? – Sirens Aug 24 '17 at 17:33
  • @Sirens that's why he wrote it might be possible – Tejas Pandya Jan 20 '18 at 12:48
0

There are many reasons this could have happened but there is one primary that springs to mind:

  • Error on Provider Network causing the disconnection and an erroneous forwarding and recording instead of a proper reconnect

This isn't that uncommon, especially during maintenance windows. It is however always startling.

Basically what happened is that you changed communication points. Usually during these times you're handed off without interruption in service by being forwarded to the new point. It's why you can make a call and it will keep in contact as you cross points.

However every now and again you make a call and the forwarding logic hits a hiccup, and instead of being forwarded correctly your phone's link to the point has gotten confused and it thinks it's supposed to make a call.

In the cases the dropped call is seen as received because the call received a forward notice... that instead initiated the call out.

To be certain though you should DEFINITELY call and confirm this was the problem with your provider. The main reason we can come to this conclusion however is that your records show and incoming call when it was actually outgoing on one record, but the correction on the other. This shouts carrier error but it's always better to get an authoritative answer form the source.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.