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Im wondering why the domain name is not encrypted when a request do a DNS Server is made. As it seems this is the main weaknesses for internet users. I came to this when i heard that in germany vodafone has blocked kinox.to from their customers.

The Question which came up is how can they determine which site you are trying to access if everything is encrypted?

And could we solve the USA net neutrality problem with just encrypting the domain name?

  • the ISP? they have to know what remote to deliver to you, so i don't see how that info could be encrypted to block ISP access. That's like refusing to to give an address to a cab driver; you won't get far. – dandavis Mar 5 '18 at 20:11
  • No it's not the same. To encrypt the IP is one thing ... and will not take place anytime soon (look at the TOR Projekt). But getting the IP from the DNS Server by the Domain should be possible without the ISP knwowing what i requested. – Noel Schenk Mar 6 '18 at 8:44
  • It's like saying to the cab driver ... "drive me to NewYork (IP location)". So he will know where to go but you won't tell him where exactly. Once in NewYork you can hire another cab driver from NewYork (requested server) who will decrypt the message, you kept from the other driver and navigate you to the exact location (website on the server). – Noel Schenk Mar 6 '18 at 8:48
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... why the domain name is not encrypted when a request do a DNS Server is made.

DNS is an old protocol which predates the massive use of encryption on the internet. It was designed at a time when the peers in the network were usually considered trusted or at least not malicious. There are actually alternatives which encrypt the names, like DNS over HTTPS, DNS over TLS or DNSCurve.

And could we solve the USA net neutrality problem with just encrypting the domain name?

Net neutrality is more about preferring one kind of traffic against other kinds and less about blocking illegal content (which is usually explicitly allowed even with net neutrality). Even if you encrypt the domain name the source and target IP of the connection, the used ports and the traffic pattern are still visible to the ISP and can be used for categorization of traffic. Also, the ISP might let preferred customers mark their traffic in a specific way so that it gets priority. Thus, hiding DNS from the ISP will not help much with net neutrality. It might help with privacy though, i.e. making it harder for the ISP to use or sell behavior information about your internet usage.

  • so a VPN or something which hides the actual IP is the only way for bypassing these restrictions – Noel Schenk Mar 4 '18 at 9:52
  • @NoelSchenk: VPN might not help with net neutrality. An ISP can detect the use of VPN and slow it down or block it. That's actually done for example in China. VPN will help with privacy though. – Steffen Ullrich Mar 4 '18 at 9:55

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