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I would like some further clarification on this topic.

Is there a way to disable JavaScript on Mozilla Firefox and still view the web pages correctly? If yes, will this setting be enough to hide the real IP in case the VPN drops when passively viewing a web page?

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    If the VPN drops mid-connection, your IP may (probably will) leak on the next packet sent by your computer. There's nothing that you can do to fix that. And disabling JavaScript will break any page that requires JavaScript to work correctly. At this point, that is almost every page. Install the NoScript extension to play around with it and see. – Neil Smithline Apr 15 '18 at 14:46
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Is there a way to disable JavaScript on Mozilla Firefox and still view the web pages correctly?

No. Because lots of web pages need JavaScript.

If yes, will this setting be enough to hide the real IP in case the VPN drops when passively viewing a web page?

No. There are other techniques that could be used to leak your IP in this case - such as an iframe with <meta refresh>. Although, they're far less common.

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You can disable JavaScript in Firefox. Go to about:config and change the value for javascript.enabled, see this for details.

But it will not stop your IP from being revealed in case your VPN connection drops. It might decrease the risk somewhat, but not eliminate it. After all, the VPN might go down mid page load (and pages can keep loading things for quite some time in the background).

What you need is a "kill switch", i.e. something that shuts down all connections as soon as your VPN goes down. Quite often, VPN software comes with one included.

  • Agreed, a VPN Kill Switch is the only way to solve this. Or rely on an external hardware VPN with a kill switch. Javascript doesn't have much to do with this equation -- and while there are good security reasons to disable it, it's less relevant to the objective you have. – keithRozario Apr 16 '18 at 1:12
  • An active "kill switch" is just silly. What would really be useful is a firewall rule that blocks non-VPN traffic. – forest Apr 16 '18 at 10:02
  • @forest Yeah, thats how it is implemented. Commercial VPN vendors call it a kill switch, its not a very descriptive name, but thats what they call it. – Anders Apr 16 '18 at 10:07
  • Ah, I was under the impression that it was some program which actively monitored the state of the VPN and would attempt to reactively cut the internet if it broke. – forest Apr 16 '18 at 10:09
  • @forest I did some more research, and to be honest I am not sure exactly how this functionality is implemented. It's hard to get through all the marketing talk... – Anders Apr 16 '18 at 15:14

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