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I moved into my new home three years ago. All pre-wiring had been installed during the build.

The day of move in there was a security company installing the security system which included outside cameras and inside panel systems. At that time I gave the installer general personal information (Wi-Fi password).

While he was going over the instructions I noticed in Wi-Fi settings a network name with a very strong signal which was unprotected. When I mentioned it I was told it probably was just a neighbor and at the time dismissed it.

However, since that time my cameras were hacked and I found two hidden cameras inside the house (bedrooms) as smoke detectors. They have been removed and I had the old touch panels removed and I'm with a new company.

Unfortunately, I still feel like I'm being watched and the Wi-Fi network I mentioned above is still going strong. I understand I sound like a paranoid woman but really I'm not.

I've gone into settings many times and pressed forget this network due to the unsecured status I'm unable to remove it. After boring you with all of this I just want to know how to find out who the network name belongs to and see if I recognize this person. I know nothing about this stuff and frankly never thought I would be a victim to a voyeur.

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    What about finding where the AP is instead of the Wi-Fi owner? The AP is easier to find - you can track it by it's Wi-Fi signal strength. – Vilican Apr 21 '18 at 14:52
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    Do you live in a house? (In that case, you should have enough space to build a signal strength heatmap and locate the source.) Also, you seem to imply the source may be in your house, in that case, temporarily cut electricity and see if the network disappears. – Arminius Apr 21 '18 at 15:04
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    "However, since that time my cameras were hacked and I found two hidden cameras inside the house (bedrooms) as smoke detectors." What do you mean by "were hacked"? And after finding hidden cameras in your house, did you notify authorities? – Arminius Apr 21 '18 at 15:06
  • @Vilican Exactly what I wanted to suggest. There's plenty of android apps out there, one can just find wifi signal analyzer and go from there, find where the signal gets close to 30-ish dBm. – Sergiy Kolodyazhnyy Apr 21 '18 at 19:35
  • "I found two hidden cameras inside the house (bedrooms) as smoke detectors." => you have far bigger problems than just a WiFi signal. Immediately contact police and report the issue, let them investigate that, this is a serious privacy invasion. – Patrick Mevzek Apr 22 '18 at 19:48
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I'd recommend going to your fuseboard and turning off power to different rooms one by one, keep checking to see if the network is still going - if you can have all the power off and the network is still up, then its most likely not on your property. However, if one of the switches turns off the signal, then the access point is on your premises.

i'm not sure by what you meant when you said 'your cameras were hacked', but if you've found hidden cameras in your home then i'd notify the authorities asap.

You could also try connecting to this network and seeing if there is an admin panel that you can access at 127.0.0.1 or 192.168.0.1(most common addresses)

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    A lot of covert monitoring equipment has its own backup power, so turning off power to each room is not necessarily going to be fruitful. And this is assuming the OP is right, too. – forest Apr 22 '18 at 6:40

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