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Wikipedia says that

Its device drivers have been digitally signed with the private keys of two certificates that were stolen from separate well-known companies, JMicron and Realtek, both located at Hsinchu Science Park in Taiwan

Source: Wikipedia - Stuxnet - Windows infection

However, I can't understand how stolen certificates make the drivers be digitally signed with the private keys of JMicron and Realtek. As far as I know, certificate has only information of a company, and its public key. There's no information about private key in certificate. Does it mean that their private keys were stolen too?

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    Well, most report has a habit of simplify the term and say "stolen certificate", which actually mean certificate issuance private key is stolen. – mootmoot Jul 19 '18 at 12:11
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It is not the certificates that have been stolen, but their private keys.

The formulation is indeed ambiguous. You should read it this way:

Its device drivers have been digitally signed with the private keys (of two certificates) that were stolen from separate well-known companies, JMicron and Realtek, both located at Hsinchu Science Park in Taiwan

(Parentheses and emphases are mines.)

I suppose the term certificate has been added to help the reader understand that they're talking about asymmetric cryptography, certificates, and trusted third parties.

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