1

The GNU Privacy Handbook says:

The command-line option -gen-key is used to create a new primary keypair.

gpg --gen-key

Does a keypair mean a pair of private key and public key?

The book also says there is a public key ring. Does it mean the place which stores the public keys created locally and received from others?

Is there a private key ring?

Thanks.

4

Does a keypair mean a pair of private key and public key?

Yes.

The book also says there is a public key ring. Does it mean the place which stores the public keys created locally and received from others?

Yes.

Is there a private key ring?

In a default setup you would only have your own private key. Therefore it would not make a whole lot of sense to have a keyring containing only a single key. This term is therefore not really common.

  • You may want to add that gpg stores the private keys, including subkeys, in the ~/.gnupg/private-keys-v1.d directory in individual files named <keygrip>.key – RubberStamp Feb 4 at 12:56
  • Thanks. (1) "In a default setup you would only have your own private key." Do you mean by default, I can only have one private key, while I can have multiple public keys (the only one for my private key and the public keys from others)? (2) Are public keys and private keys store separately? (3) Is the public key(s) for my private key(s) stored with the public keys from others together in the same "public key ring"? Is the public key ring a single file? – Tim Feb 4 at 13:09
  • (1) Yes. That would be pretty standard. (2) Yes. The public key is readable for everyone, while the private key should be stored in an encrypted format. (3) I believe this is the case. Anyways, files are probably not that important to understand the concepts of private and public keys. – Euphrasius von der Hummelwiese Feb 4 at 13:37

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.