2

Giving the following scenario:

A is an Embedded System with an encrypted firmware (No one can read its code or even the bin file in any way).

B is an RESTFUL server (AWS cloud based)

A sends an HTTPs request to B which includes a header as follow:

GET https://endpoint/file,  Headers{"SecretKey":"123456"}

B will reply with a file.

Assumptions:

  • The embedded system A is 100% secured and no one can see its code or its bin file.
  • The server and the back-end code are 100% secured and non hackable.

P.S. Nothing is 100% secure. However, I put those assumptions so you do not have to worry about them. I need to know the possibilities other than hacking the embedded system or the server which I already know about them.

Questions:

  1. Is it possible to any one who has full access to the client's network (e.g. Owner) to get the raw (unencrypted) SecretKey header sent by A?
  2. Is it possible to any one who has full access to the client's network (e.g. Owner) to get the raw (unencrypted) file returned from B?
  3. If the answer to the previous questions is yes, what is the chance? What can I do to prevent this as much as possible?
  • 1
    There is no such thing as 100% secured and non hackable. – Rohith K D Apr 2 at 7:47
  • 1
    @RohithKD sure! I just put those assumptions so you do not have to worry about them. I need to know the possibilities other than hacking the embedded system or the server which I already know. – Humam Helfawi Apr 2 at 7:48
3

The traffic between A and B is transmitted over HTTPS and is thus encrypted and authenticated. If properly implemented, it is not possible for an attacker to see this traffic, even with access to the network.

For this to be secure the client device has to do proper verification of the server certificate. Is the certificate properly signed and does it belong to the correct domain?

A typical way to intercept HTTPS traffic is to configure another root certificate to be trusted on the device. You should not allow the user to configure the device this way.

  • Thank you very much for detailed answer! I will take certificate verification into account, – Humam Helfawi Apr 2 at 12:40
  • Reasearch HTTPS MITM attacks for more information. It's not just for hackers. Some corporate traffic inspection proxies are set up this way, so the client is often configured to trust the proxy as an authority - something which could be abused by an admin. – GuitarPicker Apr 2 at 14:22

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