0

I have a nice, expensive, metal credit card with a chip but it's from an older card. I’m wanting to rewrite the magnetic stripe and the chip to my new card. I know how to rewrite the magnetic stripe but what do I need to buy and do, to rewrite the chip?

closed as off-topic by multithr3at3d, MechMK1, Xander, A. Hersean, Peter Harmann Aug 9 at 18:01

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave these specific reasons:

  • "Questions asking us to break the security of a specific system for you are off-topic unless they demonstrate an understanding of the concepts involved and clearly identify a specific problem." – A. Hersean, Peter Harmann
  • "This question does not appear to be about Information security within the scope defined in the help center." – multithr3at3d, MechMK1, Xander
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 1
    The point of the chip is to make it impossible to do what you want to do. – Joseph Sible Aug 1 at 14:56
  • 6
    Probably something like physically destroying the card using acid etching to gain direct access to the microprocessor, then trying to reverse-engineer it. These chips are designed to prevent exactly what you propose. With physical access, it's still possible of course, just very expensive, and likely requires a degree in EE, expensive equipment, and MANY hours. I have a suspicion you're just trying to commit fraud, however. – Steve Sether Aug 1 at 15:08
  • 1
    ...If you only care about contact (+ stripe) you might be able to transfer the physical chip itself, since all of the hardware appears to lie under the contact pad. If you have a contactless card, you might be out of luck, since the antenna might be embedded into the rest of the card. – Clockwork-Muse Aug 1 at 17:47
1

In almost all cases I've seen (both working at a bank, and owning a bunch of credit cards), when the bank issued you your new card the old card was either immediately blocked, or set to expire (AKA be blocked) 30-90 days in the future. As a result, the magstripe and chip contained in the old card will soon be non-functional, assuming they are not already. I would recommend simply using the new card mailed to you by your bank, and not landing yourself on any watchlists by purchasing the expensive equipment required to attempt what you're looking to do.

Plus, depending on the bank, when you mess up and render the new card useless, they may take great pleasure in charging you a new card fee to allow you the privilege of continuing to access your accounts with them.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.