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Why not just create a network named: Starbucks_passIsHelloWorld, wouldn't that prevent the network from having some security issues?

After that every user would be able to login using the password and have better security.

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    what are you asking exactly? – Vipul Nair Aug 2 at 14:31
  • @VipulNair I made an edit. Is it more clear now? – Honey Aug 2 at 14:38
  • "wouldn't that prevent the network from having some security issues?" How did you come to that conclusions? also "using the password and have better security." how did you come to this conclusion? – Vipul Nair Aug 2 at 14:41
  • I've read that you shouldn't join a network that doesn't have a password, because 1. you may get MITM. Hence dumping the password to the user will add a layer of encryption – Honey Aug 2 at 14:52
  • thats not true.If you use HTTPS then you wont get MITM even on an open wifi.Btw are you talking about a captive portal? – Vipul Nair Aug 2 at 14:56
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Why not just create a network named: Starbucks_passIsHelloWorld, wouldn't that prevent the network from having some security issues?

There is a few reasons to use captive portals instead of just a password.

  1. In a shop/college its hard to authenticate with just a password.Basically WI-FI is just radio waves so anyone and everyone that CAN will authenticate and use the network.
  2. Wifi authentication in and of itself doesn't support 2FA.So anyone can use free internet to do anything illegal.That why is partly why they require your phone number before giving you internet
  3. Using a captive portal also help to keep track of users and their usage.
  4. Changing a password of WI-FI is not scalable.Think of trying to tell the password to all people in a campus

There are more reasons to captive portal just google it

After that every user would be able to login using the password and have better security.

I am guessing you are talking about the security of people that authenticate with a open/password protected WI-FI as you say in the comments.Lets just say SSL/TLS was created for solving a problem such as this.If an attacker and you are in the same network(i.e connected to the same wifi hotspot) and you happen to visit a HTTP site an attacker will be able to see it(MITM).Just to drive the point if a wifi is open or password protected and happen to visit a site with HTTPS.No an attacker wont see anything.PERIOD

  • "In a shop/college its hard to authenticate with just a password.Basically WI-FI is just radio waves so anyone and everyone that CAN will authenticate and use the network." You mean the intention is to tie it down to a student's user/pass which is more vital/personal to the user, hence less of a chance that he would share that with another person. That's a good point. But the reasons you provide don't explain why my suggestion isn't better for a small Starbucks coffee store. It's not as big as a campus. – Honey Aug 2 at 15:38
  • I do understand the illegal activity...are you saying governments would rather have users login with something trackable rather than allowing users to securly connect to a network? – Honey Aug 2 at 15:39
  • imagine someone looking at child porn from your open wifi with your IP address.The feds will come knocking on your shop. – Vipul Nair Aug 2 at 15:43
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    Let us continue this discussion in chat. – Vipul Nair Aug 2 at 16:37
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The answer to this question is yes, and no. You see it would make it secure if no one was able to sniff the wireless traffic. But when using a shared key, if I can sniff packets, and watch your device authenticate and associate to the network, and I capture your devices 4 way handshake, I now have all the information I need to decrypt your data. Unless you are using another level of encryption, like a website using HTTPS, or a VPN tunnel.

  • Given that you haven't made the blog post yet, I'm not sure it's appropriate to link to your website. It would be better to link directly to the post once you've made it, as it would actually include information relevant to the question, rather than just being self-promotion. – AndrolGenhald Aug 20 at 0:50
  • The point for adding the link, was to let the OP know that there will be a place to look for a more detailed explanation in the future. I never made any claim it was already there, and the post that I do have up, is relevant to WI-FI, and may answer other questions the OP has. If this goes against in sort of terms of use, then I will avoid doing so in the future. – James Scott Aug 20 at 1:02
  • Hi, I temporarily removed the link to your not yet written blog post. Write the blog post, if it is done, and you link it, that is okay. – peterh says reinstate Monica Aug 20 at 1:35
  • @JamesScott you can leave a comment here about a related link. That’s totally fine as long as the post offers some value – Honey Aug 20 at 1:42

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