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There are sites like grabify and iplogger.org which allow you to get the IP of the person who has clicked the link. Logs are also generated by various bots when you send a message via Twitter, WhatsApp, Facebook or Instagram.

Will it be possible to get the IP of the individual without him clicking the link?

An example scenario is as follows: A sends msg to B with link. As soon as message lands in B's, inbox we get the IP address of B.

Some services do generate logs in when link previews are generated but they are bots.

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Common in modern marketing email is the practice of including "tracking pixels." These are small 1x1 transparent images embedded into the email that are hosted on an external web server. When the user opens the message, their email client will download the image from the external server, creating a entry in the external server's logs.

However, this method has some limitations:

  • The user must open the message. If they don't, the message and tracking pixel will never be loaded.
  • Not all email clients load external images by default. Some will ask the user whether they would like to load the images in the email, and if the user opts not to, the tracking pixel will not be downloaded.
  • Some email services (Gmail?) will proxy image downloads on behalf of the client. In this case, you would get the IP address of the proxy rather than the final recipient.

I am not aware of a method that would allow you to get the IP address of an email recipient 100% reliably. Tracking pixels get part of the way there but they are more effective for tracking email open rates than for collecting IP addresses.

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  • Thank you. Is there such a method that can be used in chats? Like facebook, whatsapp etc.
    – Smith
    Jan 21, 2020 at 6:39
  • I am not aware of any similar methods for chats. This is generally intentional to protect user privacy. It is more difficult to implement privacy protections in email because it is an old and decentralized standard, but centralized messaging services would generally consider the ability to easily find the IP address of another user without their interaction to be a security vulnerability.
    – tlng05
    Jan 21, 2020 at 6:46
  • Valid point. Thank you
    – Smith
    Jan 21, 2020 at 6:51

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