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When connecting to a specific website(www.test.yyy.com) inside of an organisation SSL/TLS handshake is performed. From my understanding, I would say that one of my personal certificates on computer is used to validate the encryption/decryption of transferred data.

Now I want to figure out which one is used for that specific handshake, because I would like to transfer it to my second computer (if it is not signed to a specific device*).

FYI: On my second computer I can't access (www.test.yyy.com), because I get error message ERR_BAD_SSL_CLIENT_AUTH_CERT, thats why Iam assuming, that certificate is missing.

Is there any tool or a way to figure out this, I've in mind something like a debugger tool for monitoring HTTPS requests?

  • If your browser doesn't tell you which client cert it uses, use wireshark. – Z.T. Feb 11 at 9:48
  • This varies from browser, OS, configuration, etc.. For example, in Chrome you can set that some certificates should always be used for certain sites. Also, the error could also mean that you sent a certificate, but it is for some reason not accepted. – MechMK1 Feb 11 at 10:05
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Unless you specifically configure your web browser to use a client certificate for the site that you're connecting to, your browser does not use a certificate to make the SSL/TLS handshake with the server.

Instead, your browser receives the server's certificate, and verifies that it was signed using a certificate in your browser's or OS's certificate store that the browser trusts. There may be one or more certificates in this chain of trust. You can view this chain by clicking the padlock icon in the address bar of your web browser. The certificate at the top of the chain is the certificate that your browser trusts, so this is the certificate that you would want to transfer to your second computer.

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