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In the power saving settings in MacOS you can schedule the mac to startup/shutdown at a specific time, but what wonders me is the startup function. A requirement is that the mac is connected to a physical cord.

  • How does a MacOS system power itself on when there isn't a physical 'push' initiated, is it possible to start up the mac without connecting it to a physical power cord?

Also, where comes this signal frog. Does it send an electrical signal to other devices on the electrical grid to get an on signal?

Then, If I create a PUP, or other low-effort "viruses" for mac, can I use this phenomenon?

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  • This is more of a question for the OS and it's not a security question. It wakes up due to an internal clock ... – schroeder Mar 26 at 10:10
  • @schroeder I remember there was a similar question for Windows on this site. "Is it possible for a virus to boot the system if the system is powered off?" Although I can't remember about the security. So if it wakes up it isn't really off, is it? also why does it need to be connected to a power cable? – CriticalSYS Mar 26 at 10:15
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    not asecurity question but one about the fuctioning of the watchdog... this will send a power on signal (simielar to pressing the power up button) after a specific interval. causing the system to power up. this is functionality present in most if not all ATX based systems. some require a mains power connection for the clock to work. some don't. It basically works like an "alarm" that pushes the power button. – LvB Mar 26 at 10:20
  • @LvB Ok i get it the power cord is something similar like a CMOS battery on non-macs, and can every program schedule such a power on signal on any OS regardless the permissions? – CriticalSYS Mar 26 at 10:31
  • it usally requirers ring-0 acces... (aka root access) but thats implementation dependant. check with the manufacturer of your mainbord if you need that level of detail. – LvB Mar 26 at 10:33

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