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Out of curiosity. I am a green as grass programmer coming from other career disciplines and am learning multiple languages right now so play nice and keep it simple please. Interested in simple security protocols for scrambling data before the network. I am curious to know if this very simple, basic method of scrambling financial numbers is easily crackable by machine or by human evaluation. Assuming the level of human is the general level of genius I've seen on this forum.

In sudo-code:

Balance sheet financials:

18485.45
347.56
34564.44 <------ Take one number as example
345543.33
120045.76
1205847.87
876.00

1st layer-

34564.44 to multiply each number by day+month+year

Example last edited date timestamp: Today (21/01/2021) = 2043
3 x 2043 = 6129
4 x 2043 = 8172
5 x 2043 = 10215
6 x 2043 = 12258
4 x 2043 = 8172
. 4 x 2043 = 8172
4 x 2043 = 8172

Becomes: 6129817210215122588172.81728172

2nd layer-

6129817210215122588172.81728172 to encrypt using alphabetical numeric position

A-1 B-2 C-3 D-4 E-5 F-6 G-7 H-8 etc...

6129817210215122588172.81728172
Becomes: FABIHAGBA0BAEABBEHHAGB.HAGBHAGB

FABIHAGBA0BAEABBEHHAGB.HAGBHAGB is then used for JSON transfer with HTTPS.

This is an extremely elementary example with only a few simple steps. Just curious how easy this would be to break, the principle being that the data is scrambled as much as possible BEFORE networking and with only the host knowing the "key" for decryption. Example above would be the date timestamp.

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  • May I ask why you desire to "scramble" data and not encrypt it properly?
    – user163495
    Commented Jan 21, 2021 at 22:59
  • user- that definitely helps, gives me a starting point to study some basics anyway. @MechMK1 - really just an added layer of protection. I would scramble then encrypt if anything.
    – RobbB
    Commented Jan 21, 2021 at 23:13
  • @RobbB I'd argue that it doesn't really add anything if you're encrypting it, it just adds additional complexity to the system. Also what kind of multiplication are you doing on the numbers? If it's floating point, you'll need to be absolutely sure that multiplying, then dividing will give you the same number every time (bad things will happen if you take financial data and give back different numbers on the other side).
    – user
    Commented Jan 21, 2021 at 23:34
  • Point taken. On the numbers, it would be made sure that the decryption results were exact.
    – RobbB
    Commented Jan 21, 2021 at 23:43
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    Very easy to crack. Don't waste your time implementing this.
    – hft
    Commented Jan 22, 2021 at 7:06

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