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My phone is encrypted and i was just playing with the configuration and just found a Trusted Credentials that got me curious on what it is and specially in one called Government Root Certification Authority (Government Root (CA) or Goverment(CA)) and i'm wondering what is that. Also i'm wondering what kind of vulnerability this may put on my phone and if i should disable some of those credentials.

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Trusted credentials are nothing else than CA's your device is trusting. This is basically a truststore of your phone. Disabling them may lead to a lot of problems with applications that depend on certificate-based authentication (most of them really). When you trust a root CA you'll also trust the certificates issued by it. This is very important for accessing different API's and webservers. I would not touch those settings if you don't know anything about the public key cryptography and implications of trust.

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Trusted Credentials provide a way for your phone to practically guarantee that the websites it talks to are actually who they say they are.

So the "Government Trusted Credential" doesn't mean your phone trusts the government. It means that when your phone talks to a website who claims that it is the government, your phone can independently check that its true.

Trusted Credentials are created and distributed by Certificate Authorities (CAs). Your phone's vendor/manufactuer will take commonly used credentials that are published from trusted CAs and hardcode them into the OS. You should also be able to optionally disable/delete the listed Trusted Credentials or add your own.

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  • It means that when your phone talks to a website who claims that it is the government, your phone can independently check that its true - rather ...your phone can independently check that the government says so. Of course, trusting a website that uses a certificate ultimately means trusting the root ca.
    – Haukinger
    Oct 6, 2023 at 14:52

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