1

Spier makes lots of claims;

How to Hack Someone’s Phone Remotely

How to Hack Someone’s Phone Without Touching It

We have Signaling System No. 7 (SS7) flaw that can be used to monitor activities, however, remote hacking is a way bigger claim.

Similarly, products like JbeeMonitor, MinSpy, etc.

What I actually think is that you need to install a hidden program on the target. Otherwise, we should have lots of purchases from police departments of the USA, similar to the Stingray phone tracker.

Do they really hack the phones remotely to monitor and steal information? Or it is just a selling point (fishing) that you actually install a program on the target system!

2

As far as can be ascertained from the page you linked to, No.

Hack Someone’s Phone Remotely

The article seems extremely misleading. Spyier can't hack a phone remotely, it can only access it remotely once the target phone is already compromised. Step 2 says:

Follow the on-screen guide and install the Spyier app on the target Android phone

That line, and the fact that they have a separate section on 'how to hack a phone without touching it' imply that you need hands on access to the device to install an app, and can only access it remotely afterwards.

Hack Someone's Phone Without Touching It

The article clearly says

You only need to enter the iCloud credentials of the target device in order to configure Spyier.

Yeah, right. Just give us the password and we'll hack it for you...

You can remotely install apps on an iOS device if you have access to the iCloud account it is connected to. No big surprise.

6
  • Thanks for the answer and typos. This is what I consider, however, they mislead deliberately by the usage of unrelated technical words. Also, I've found this in the reviews(!). I wish someone who really purchased the product tell the truth.
    – kelalaka
    Oct 8 at 16:47
  • @kelalaka If they call signing in to iCloud to install an app "hacking a phone without touching it", I'd say it is extremely unlikely they a have a zero day rce for android. At most, they might use a public exploit for some old version of android, but that too seems unlikely.
    – nobody
    Oct 8 at 17:34
  • 1
    It seems like a cleverly marketed remote management solution
    – MechMK1
    Oct 8 at 21:36
  • Since @MechMK1 also agrees, I've accepted. But I don't think this a clever solution, rather a sly act.
    – kelalaka
    Oct 9 at 20:12
  • @kelalaka Of course. Software manufacturers have financial incentive to be (borderline) deceptive in their marketing and imply their software can things it realistically can't.
    – MechMK1
    Oct 9 at 20:31

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